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See also: Dood

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Bengali [Term?]

NounEdit

dood (plural doods)

  1. A riding camel or dromedary.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

dood (plural doods)

  1. Nonstandard spelling of dude.
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch dood, from Middle Dutch doot, from Old Dutch dōt, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

AdjectiveEdit

dood (attributive dooie, comparative dooier, superlative doodste or dooiste)

  1. dead
  2. (figuratively) exhausted; listless; fatigued
Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

dood

  1. dead
  2. (figuratively) exhausted; listless; fatigued
    Hy het gister dood aangekom.
    Yesterday, he arrived exhausted.

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch dood, from Middle Dutch doot, from Old Dutch dōth, from Proto-Germanic *dauþuz.

NounEdit

dood (uncountable)

  1. death; the act of dying
  2. the dead; something that is no longer alive
  3. (figuratively) a complete loss
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Dutch doden, from Middle Dutch doden, from Old Dutch *dōden, from Proto-Germanic *daudijaną.

VerbEdit

dood (present dood, present participle dodende, past participle gedood)

  1. (transitive) to kill
  2. (transitive) to end permanently
Derived termsEdit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch doot, doet, from Old Dutch dōt, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Compare West Frisian dead, German tot, English dead, Danish død.

AdjectiveEdit

dood (comparative doder, superlative doodst)

  1. dead
InflectionEdit
Inflection of dood
uninflected dood
inflected dode
comparative doder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial dood doder het doodst
het doodste
indefinite m./f. sing. dode dodere doodste
n. sing. dood doder doodste
plural dode dodere doodste
definite dode dodere doodste
partitive doods doders
Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

dood

  1. (colloquial, East and West Flanders) A lot.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch doot, doet, from Old Dutch dōth, dōt, from Proto-Germanic *dauþuz. Compare West Frisian dead, German Tod, English death, Danish død.

NounEdit

dood m (uncountable)

  1. death
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From doden.

VerbEdit

dood

  1. first-person singular present indicative of doden
  2. imperative of doden

AnagramsEdit


Saterland FrisianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dood

  1. dead

SomaliEdit

VerbEdit

dood

  1. to debate; to dispute