invalid

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

in- +‎ valid

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ĭn-vă'lĭd, IPA(key): /ɪnˈvæl.ɪd/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

invalid (comparative more invalid, superlative most invalid)

  1. Not valid; not true, correct, acceptable or appropriate.
    Your argument is invalid because it uses circular reasoning.
    This invalid contract cannot be legally enforced.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French invalide, from Latin invalidus (infirm, weak), from in- (not) + validus (strong)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

invalid (plural invalids)

  1. (dated, sometimes offensive) Any person with a disability or illness.
  2. (dated, sometimes offensive) A person who is confined to home or bed because of illness, disability or injury; one who is too sick or weak to care for themselves.
  3. (archaic) A disabled member of the armed forces; one unfit for active duty due to injury.
Usage notesEdit

The use of this word to label persons with disabilities gives the impression of invalidation, hence its offensiveness.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

invalid (not comparable)

  1. Suffering from disability or illness.
    • 2000, Diane Price Herndl, Invalid Women: Figuring Feminine Illness in American Fiction and Culture, 1840-1940, University of North Carolina Press, →ISBN, page 1:
      Invalidism therefore referred to a lack of power as well as a tendency toward illness. It is for this reason that I choose to discuss the invalid woman rather than just the ill one.
  2. Intended for use by an invalid.
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

invalid (third-person singular simple present invalids, present participle invaliding, simple past and past participle invalided)

  1. (Britain, transitive) To exempt from duty because of injury or ill health.
    He was invalided home after the car crash.
  2. (transitive) To make invalid or affect with disease.

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

invalid (not comparable)

  1. invalid (confined to home or bed because of illness or disability)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


IndonesianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch invalide, from French invalide, from Latin invalidus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ɪnˈvalɪt]
  • Hyphenation: in‧va‧lid

AdjectiveEdit

invalid

  1. disabled, handicapped.
    Synonyms: cedera, lemah

Etymology 2Edit

From English invalid.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ɪnˈvalɪt]
  • Hyphenation: in‧va‧lid

AdjectiveEdit

invalid

  1. invalid.
    Synonyms: batal, tidak sah

Etymology 3Edit

From Dutch in +‎ failliet (bankrupt).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ɪnˈvalɪt]
  • Hyphenation: in‧va‧lid

AdjectiveEdit

invalid

  1. (colloquial) bankrupt.
    Synonym: bangkrut

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French invalide, from Latin invalidus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

invalid m or n (feminine singular invalidă, masculine plural invalizi, feminine and neuter plural invalide)

  1. crippled, disabled
    Synonyms: infirm, schilod, beteag

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

invalid m (plural invalizi, feminine equivalent invalidă)

  1. cripple, disabled person
    Synonyms: infirm, schilod

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /inʋǎliːd/
  • Hyphenation: in‧va‧lid

NounEdit

invàlīd m (Cyrillic spelling инва̀лӣд)

  1. invalid

DeclensionEdit