EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English liggen, from Old English licgan (to lie, be situated, be at rest, remain) and Old Norse liggja (to lie). More at lie.

VerbEdit

lig (third-person singular simple present ligs, present participle ligging, simple past and past participle ligged)

  1. (intransitive, UK dialectal) To lie; be in a prostrate or recumbent position.
  2. (transitive, UK dialectal) To lay.

Derived termsEdit

  • lig down
  • lig on
  • lig out

Related termsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch liggen.

VerbEdit

lig (present lig, present participle liggende, past participle gelig)

  1. (intransitive) to lie, to be lying down
  2. (intransitive) to be situated

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch licht.

AdjectiveEdit

lig (attributive ligte, comparative ligter, superlative ligste)

  1. (of weight) light; not heavy
    Die tas is lig. (The suitcase is light.)
  2. (of color or complexion) light; pale; not dark
    Hy dra 'n ligblou hemp. (He wears a light blue shirt.)

Etymology 3Edit

From Dutch licht.

NounEdit

lig (plural ligte)

  1. light

AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *alig-, from Proto-Indo-European *h3lig-o- 'indigent, needy, ill'. Cognate to Ancient Greek ὀλίγος (oligos, small, little), Lithuanian ligas (ill, worse), ligà (illness), Latvian liga (epidemic disease).

AdjectiveEdit

lig m (feminine lige)

  1. bad, worse, ill

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse líkr.

AdjectiveEdit

lig (neuter ligt or lig, definite and plural lig)

  1. equal to
  2. like, similar to

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse lík (body), from Proto-Germanic *līką, from Proto-Indo-European *līg-.

NounEdit

lig n (singular definite liget, plural indefinite lig)

  1. body, corpse
  2. crock (an old or broken-down vehicle)
InflectionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse lík (leech).

NounEdit

lig n (singular definite liget, plural indefinite lig)

  1. (nautical) leech
InflectionEdit

Etymology 4Edit

See ligge (to lie).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lig

  1. Imperative of ligge.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lig

  1. first-person singular present indicative of liggen
  2. imperative of liggen

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • léig (archaic)
  • leog (Munster)

EtymologyEdit

From earlier léig, from Old Irish léicid, from Proto-Celtic *linkʷo-, from Proto-Indo-European *li-n-kʷ-, present stem of *leykʷ-. Cognate with Sanskrit रिणक्ति (riṇákti), Latin linquō, Greek λείπω (leipō), Gothic 𐌻𐌴𐌹𐍈𐌰𐌽 (leiƕan), Lithuanian lìkti.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lig (present analytic ligeann, future analytic ligfidh, verbal noun ligean, past participle ligthe)

  1. to let, allow

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

lig

  1. rafsi of sligu.

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *laugiz (fire, flame, lightning), from Proto-Indo-European *leuk- (light; white; to shine). Cognate with Old High German loug, Old Norse lǫygr, log, loga (flame, low). More at low.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

līġ m (nominative plural līgas)

  1. fire; flame

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: leye

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French ligue.

NounEdit

lig

  1. league (organization of sports teams)


This Turkish entry was created from the translations listed at league. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see lig in the Turkish Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) November 2009


VolapükEdit

NounEdit

lig

  1. liquor
Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 03:54