flet

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English flet ‎(floor of a house; house), from Old English flet, flett ‎(the ground; the floor of a house; house; dwelling), from Proto-Germanic *flatją ‎(a flat or level surface, level ground, floor, hallway), from Proto-Indo-European *plad- ‎(flat, broad). Cognate with Dutch vlet ‎(vessel), Low German Flet ‎(an upper bedroom), German Fletz, Flötz ‎(level ground, threshing floor, hallway, set of rooms or benches). More at flat.

NounEdit

flet ‎(plural flets)

  1. (rare or dialectal) Floor; bottom; lower surface.
  2. (rare or dialectal) A house; home.

DanishEdit

VerbEdit

flet

  1. imperative of flette

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flet m ‎(plural flets)

  1. flounder (fish)

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English flet, flett ‎(floor, ground; dwelling, house), from Proto-Germanic *flatją ‎(floor), from Proto-Germanic *flataz ‎(flat), from Proto-Indo-European *plat- ‎(flat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flet (plural flets)

  1. the floor, ground
    Cliued mi saule to þi flet. — Northern Verse Psalter, 1400
  2. a dwelling, habitation, house, cottage, hall
    Þe lorde..Fyndez fire vpon flet, þe freke þer byside. — Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, 1400
  3. A (level) piece of ground; a battlefield
    Wiþ four othre meteþ he ... & fuld hem on þe flette. — Sir Firumbras, c1380

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Middle English Dictionary, flet

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *flatją ‎(floor), from Proto-Germanic *flataz ‎(flat), from Proto-Indo-European *plat- ‎(flat). Akin to Old Frisian flet, flette ‎(dwelling, house)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flet n ‎(nominative plural flet)

  1. the floor, ground
    Heó on flet gecrong — She sank to the ground.
  2. a dwelling, habitation, house, cottage, hall
    Gif ðæt flet geblódgad wyrþe. — If the house be stained with blood.
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Likely from Proto-Germanic *flutōną ‎(to float), from Proto-Indo-European *plewd-, *plew- ‎(to float, swim, fly); compare Danish fløde ‎(cream), Icelandic fleytið ‎(skimming), Norwegian fløte ‎(cream)

PronunciationEdit

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Particularly: “if the same as ety 1, then remove this Pron section and move Ety 1 Pron above ety 1 as level 3 hdr))”

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

flēt f ‎(nominative plural flēta)

  1. cream, skimming, curds
    Hwít sealt dó on reám oððe góde fléte. — Put white salt into cream or good skimmings.
DeclensionEdit
ReferencesEdit
  • 1916, John R. Clark, "A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary for the Use of Students", flet et al.
  • Bosworth, J. (2010, March 21). An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), flet.

PolishEdit

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flet m inan

  1. flute (woodwind instrument)

DeclensionEdit

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