Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Partially translated (forlorn), partially borrowed (hoop (pile, heap)) from Dutch verloren hoop (literally lost troop). The Dutch word hoop in this expression, for which the sense “troop” is now obsolete, is a cognate of English heap.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

forlorn hope (plural forlorn hopes)

  1. (military) A small troop picked to make an advance attack, or the first attack; a storming party.
    • 1880, Isaac Newton Arnold, Life of Benedict Arnold, page 82:
      Arnold, therefore, as usual with him, led the forlorn hope, marching about one hundred yards before the main body.
    • 1885, George Bruce Malleson, The Decisive Battles of India, page 323:
      Lieutenant Templeton of the 76th offered to lead the forlorn hope.
  2. Any dangerous or hopeless venture.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit