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See also: Hoop and hopp

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hoop, hoope, from Old English hōp (mound, raised land", in combination, also "circular object), from Proto-Germanic *hōpą (bend, bow, arch) (compare Dutch hoep), from Proto-Indo-European *kāb- (to bend) (compare Lithuanian kabė (hook), Old Church Slavonic кѫпъ (kǫpŭ, hill, island)). More at camp.

NounEdit

hoop (plural hoops)

  1. A circular band of metal used to bind a barrel.
  2. A ring; a circular band; anything resembling a hoop.
    the cheese hoop, or cylinder in which the curd is pressed in making cheese
  3. A circular band of metal, wood, or similar material used for forming part of a framework such as an awning or tent.
  4. (chiefly in the plural) A circle, or combination of circles, of thin whalebone, metal, or other elastic material, used for expanding the skirts of ladies' dresses; crinoline.
    • Alexander Pope
      stiff with hoops, and armed with ribs of whale
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      The door of the room now flew open, and, after pushing in her hoop sideways before her, entered Lady Bellaston, who having first made a very low courtesy to Mrs Fitzpatrick, and as low a one to Mr Jones, was ushered to the upper end of the room.
  5. A quart pot; so called because originally bound with hoops, like a barrel. Also, a portion of the contents measured by the distance between the hoops.
  6. (Britain, obsolete) An old measure of capacity, variously estimated at from one to four pecks.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  7. (plural) The game of basketball.
  8. A hoop earring.
  9. (Australia, metonymically, informal, dated) A jockey; from a common pattern on the blouse.[1]
  10. (sports) (usually plural) A horizontal stripe on the jersey
    • 2003 May 21, Barry Glendenning "Minute-by-minute: Celtic 2 - 3 FC Porto (AET)" The Guardian (London):
      Porto are playing from right to left in blue and white stripes, blue shorts and blue socks. Celtic are in their usual green and white hoops, with white shorts and white socks.
    • 2009 June 20, Ian O'Riordan "Tipperary look in better shape" The Irish Times:
      Tipperary v Clare: IF ANYTHING can relight the fire of the old Clare hurling passion it’s the sight of the blue jersey with the gold hoop.
  11. (usually plural) A requirement that must be met in order to proceed.
    • 1997, Security and Freedom Through Encryption (SAFE) Act:
      But if they want to export that, then they do have to go through several hoops that you will impose upon them.
    • 2000, Ed Bott, Special Edition Using Microsoft Windows, →ISBN, page 252:
      Windows forces you to jump through several hoops before allowing you to delete a partition — and for good reason.
    • 2008, Patricia Barry, Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage For Dummies, →ISBN, page 49:
      Although restrictions like prior authorization and step therapy may be of benefit in protecting people's health or even saving them money, most Medicare beneficiaries regard them as a hassle — just more hoops to go through to get the drugs they need.
    • 2011, Jason Toll, Moscow Bound, →ISBN:
      So it looks certain that I will be returning to Australia, when at the last, I am offered a job by a London school that is willing to jump through the hoops involved to sponsor me for a visa.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hoop (third-person singular simple present hoops, present participle hooping, simple past and past participle hooped)

  1. (transitive) To bind or fasten using a hoop.
    to hoop a barrel or puncheon
  2. (transitive) To clasp; to encircle; to surround.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

hoop (plural hoops)

  1. A shout; a whoop, as in whooping cough.
  2. The hoopoe.

VerbEdit

hoop (third-person singular simple present hoops, present participle hooping, simple past and past participle hooped)

  1. (dated) To utter a loud cry, or a sound imitative of the word, by way of call or pursuit; to shout.
  2. (dated) To whoop, as in whooping cough.
Derived termsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for hoop in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ hoop”, entry in 1989, Joan Hughes, Australian Words and Their Origins, page 261.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

hoop (plural hope, diminutive hopie)

  1. heap
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch hopen.

NounEdit

hoop (uncountable)

  1. hope

VerbEdit

hoop (present hoop, present participle hopende, past participle gehoop)

  1. to hope

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch hope, from Old Dutch *hopa, from the verb hopon (modern Dutch hopen). Cognate with English hope.

NounEdit

hoop f (uncountable)

  1. A hope, aspiration, wish
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

hoop

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hopen
  2. imperative of hopen

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch hôop, from Old Dutch *hōp, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz.

NounEdit

hoop m (plural hopen, diminutive hoopje n)

  1. A pile, heap, stack
  2. (figuratively) A lot, heaps
  3. A pile of manure, faeces
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *hōp, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz.

NounEdit

hôop m

  1. heap, pile
  2. group of people or animals, troop, herd
  3. meeting

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • hoop”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • hoop (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929