EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English gate (way), from Old Norse gata (road), from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ. Compare gate.

NounEdit

gait (plural gaits)

  1. Manner of walking or stepping; bearing or carriage while moving.
    Carrying a heavy suitcase, he had a lopsided gait.
  2. (equestrianism) One of the different ways in which a horse can move, either naturally or as a result of training.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

gait (third-person singular simple present gaits, present participle gaiting, simple past and past participle gaited)

  1. To teach a specific gait to a horse.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

gait (plural gaits)

  1. (UK, dialect) A sheaf of corn.
  2. (UK, dialect) A charge for pasturage.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

gait

  1. (rare) Alternative form of gate (way)

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Matasović derives this from Proto-Celtic *gozdis, a variant of *gostis, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstis (stranger). The irregular vowel change is a dissimilation from got (stammering).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gait f (genitive gaite, nominative plural gata)

  1. verbal noun of gataid: theft

InflectionEdit

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative gaitL gaitL gataH
Vocative gaitL gaitL gataH
Accusative gaitN gaitL gataH
Genitive gaiteH gaitL gaitN
Dative gaitL gataib gataib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
gait gait
pronounced with /ɣ(ʲ)-/
ngait
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*gazdo-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 155

ScotsEdit

NounEdit

gait (plural gaits)

  1. goat
  2. Alternative form of gate (way)

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gait

  1. Soft mutation of cait.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cait gait nghait chait
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.