See also: hód

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Scots hod (to jog along on horseback),[1] probably related to hotch ((verb) to move up and down jerkily, bob; to jog along on horseback; to hop like a frog; to fidget; to shrug; to heave with laughter; to cause to move jerkily; to shift in a sitting position to make room for others; to be overrun with; to swarm; (figuratively) to be angry; (noun) a jerk, jolt; a shrug; a fidget, twitch; a swarm of vermin; large, ungainly woman; untidy woman (figuratively) a hostile encounter, clash; state of disorder and filth, mess) (whence English hotch (to move irregularly up and down; to swarm) (chiefly Scotland)),[2] from Late Middle English hotchen (to move jerkily, jolt; to attack (someone) (?)),[3] from Anglo-Norman hocher (to shake (something) to and fro, jostle; to attack) and Middle French hocher, Middle French, Old French hochier (to shake (something) to and fro, jostle; to be unstable or wobbly, shake) (modern French hocher (to nod the head)), from Frankish *hotsōn, *hottisōn, from *hottōn (to shake; to toss), perhaps ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hud- (to shake), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ket- or *kwēt- (to rock back and forth; to shake),[4] probably originally onomatopoeic.[5]

Compare Scots hotter ((verb) to move in a jerky, uneven manner; to jolt; to shake; to walk unsteadily, totter; to shiver, shudder; to shake (with laughter); of liquid, etc.: to boil, bubble, seethe, sputter; to crowd, swarm; (noun) jolting or shaking; rattling sound; bubbling of boiling liquid; a shake, shiver; crowd, seething mass; motion or noise of such a crowd; jumbled heap)).[6]

Verb

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hod (third-person singular simple present hods, present participle hodding, simple past and past participle hodded)

  1. (intransitive, Scotland, obsolete) To bob up and down on horseback, as an inexperienced rider may do; to jog.
    • 1851, J. de Jean [i.e., John de Jean Fraser], “The Wild Ducks”, in Poems, Dublin: James McGlashan, []; London; Liverpool: W[illia]m S. Orr and Co., →OCLC, stanza 2, page 144:
      To have caught young wild ducks—a dozen— / So we "hodded" them in a hat to town, / To get them "pot-luck"—at least a "shake down," / With some tame, domestic cousin.
    • 1879 October 4, C. G., “The Legend of Doppelganger Tower”, in Young Ireland. An Irish Magazine of Entertainment and Instruction, volume V, number 40, Dublin: Published at the offices of the “Nation” and “Weekly News,” [], →OCLC, page 632, column 2:
      They hodded off the furniture, moth-eaten, cracked, and old, / For iron old the swords and helms and dish-covers they sold; []
    • [1884], “For a’ That, and a’ That”, in Sonnenschein’s Special Merit Readers. Standard III, London: W[illiam] Swan Sonnenschein & Co., [], →OCLC, page 8:
      Hoddin gray, a coarse grey woollen cloth, called "hoddin" from country people wearing it, who "hodded," that is, jogged along on carthorses.
    • 1889, Robert Louis Stevenson, “Mr. Mackellar’s Journey with the Master”, in The Master of Ballantrae. [], London, Paris: Cassell & Company, [], →OCLC, page 229:
      It was decided we should travel on all night; [] The bright lamps, shining forth into the mist and on the smoking horses and the hodding post-boy, gave me perhaps an outlook intrinsically more cheerful than what day had shown; or perhaps my mind had become wearied of its melancholy.

Etymology 2

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An illustration of a man carrying a hod (noun sense 1) over his shoulder.

Probably an alteration of hot ((Northern England, Scotland) large basket for carrying earth, etc.),[7] from Middle English hott, hote, hotte (large basket or pannier for carrying earth, etc.; unit of measure for grain; hut or shed (perhaps originally of wattlework); lump of dirt (?)) [and other forms],[8] from Anglo-Norman and Old French hote, hotte (large basket carried on the back) (modern French hotte (carrying basket)), from Frankish *hotta (basket), perhaps from Proto-Germanic *hud- (to shake) (see further at etymology 1), ultimately an onomatopoeia of the swaying movement of such a basket (compare Middle Dutch hotten (to jolt; shake)).[9]

Noun

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hod (plural hods)

  1. A three-sided box mounted on a pole for carrying bricks, mortar, or other construction materials over the shoulder.
    • 1580, Thomas Tusser, “A Digression to Husbandlie Furniture”, in Fiue Hundred Pointes of Good Husbandrie: [], London: [] Henrie Denham [beeing the assigne of William Seres] [], →OCLC, stanza 16:
      A fork and a hooke, to be tampring in claie, / a lath hammer, trowel, a hod, or a traie.
    • 1611, Randle Cotgrave, compiler, “Oiseau”, in A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues, London: [] Adam Islip, →OCLC, signature Lll, recto, column 1:
      Oiſeau: [] a Hodd; the Tray vvherein Maſons, &c, carrie their Mortar.
    • c. 1810?, “Arthur MacBride”, in Patrick Crotty, editor, The Penguin Book of Irish Poetry (Penguin Classics), London, New York, N.Y.: Penguin Books, published 2012, →ISBN, part IX (Songs and Ballads since 1801), stanza 6, page 924:
      And then Arthur and I, we soon drew our hods / And we scarce gave them time for to draw their own blades / When a trusty shillelagh came over their heads / And bade them take that as fair warning.
    • [1831, Thomas Carlyle, “Pedagogy”, in Sartor Resartus: The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdröckh. [], London: Chapman and Hall, [], →OCLC, book second, page 73:
      Alas, so it is everywhere, so it will ever be; till the Hod[-]man is discharged, or reduced to hodbearing; and an Architect is hired, and on all hands fitly encouraged: []]
    • 1855, Q. K. Philander Doesticks [pseudonym], “’Lection Day.—‘Paddy’ versus ‘Sam.’”, in Doesticks: What He Says, New York, N.Y.: Edward Livermore, [], →OCLC, page 277:
      Independent candidate, who wants the Irish vote and Dutch suffrages, entered, borne in a mortar hod, bare-footed, with a shillelagh in one hand, a whiskey bottle in the other, a Dutch pipe in his mouth, and a small barrel of beer strapped to his back.
    • 1865, A[mbrose] H[ardinge] Giffard, Edward Giffard, Who Was My Grandfather?: An Autobiographical Sketch, London: [] Harrison and Sons, [], →OCLC, page 13:
      Make your son a shoemaker,—a bricklayer,—or give him no more education than shall fit him to carry a hod,—and with patience and industry he may make a fortune, and he may do it with uninjured feelings; []
    • 1894, R[ichard] D[oddridge] Blackmore, “Nicie”, in Perlycross: A Tale of the Western Hills, London: Sampson Low, Marston, & Company [], →OCLC, page 20:
      Sacks of lime, and piles of sand, coils of cord and blocks of stone, scaffold-poles and timber-baulks, wheel-barrows grovelling upside-down, shovels and hods and planks and ladders, hats upon tombstones, and jackets on graves, sacred niches garnished with tobacco-pipes, and pious memories enlivened by "Jim Crow"—so cheerful was the British workman, before he was educated.
    • 1960, Stewart Alsop, “How They Got that Way: Nixon”, in Nixon & Rockefeller: A Double Portrait, Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday & Company, →OCLC, page 124:
      Put a clay pipe in [Richard] Nixon’s mouth and a hod on his shoulder or a shillelagh in his hand, and there, complete with beetling brows and uptilted nose, is the original of the old cartoon stereotype of the fighting Irishman—the Irishman of the draft riots or of Punch’s version of the Sinn Feiner.
  2. The amount of material held by a hod (sense 1); a hodful.
  3. A blowpipe used by a pewterer.
    • 1843, Charles Holtzapffel, “Soldering”, in Turning and Mechanical Manipulation. Intended as a Work of General Reference and Practical Instruction, on the Lathe, and the Various Mechanical Pursuits Followed by Amateurs, volumes I (Materials; []), London: [] Holtzapffel & Co., [], →OCLC, pages 449–450:
      The pewterers employ a very peculiar modification of the blowpipe, which may be called the hot-air blast, and the names for which apparatus are no less peculiar; a fig. 313, being called the hod, and b, the gentleman. The first is a common cast-iron pot with a close cover, containing ignited charcoal; two nozzles lead into and from it, to allow the passage of a stream of air, through the pipe c, from bellows worked by the foot.
  4. (horse racing) A bookmaker's bag.
    • 2006, Tommy Steele, chapter 6, in Bermondsey Boy: Memories of a Forgotten World, large print edition, Bath, Somerset: Windsor Paragon; BBC Audiobooks, published 2007, →ISBN, page 64:
      'Clerking' is perhaps the most difficult and most admired job on a racecourse. The next time you see a bookmaker at his hod, waving his ticket-filled hands, shouting the odds, look to his left, just back a bit—out of the limelight. The bloke sitting there with his head buried deep in a ledger is the clerk.
  5. (originally British, dialectal and US) A receptacle for carrying coal, particularly one shaped like a bucket which is designed for loading coal or coke through the door of a firebox.
    Coordinate term: scuttle
    • 1869–1870, Louisa M[ay] Alcott, “New Fashions”, in An Old-Fashioned Girl, Boston, Mass.: Roberts Brothers, published 1870, →OCLC, page 31:
      [] Fanny, forgetful of her young-ladyism and her sixteen years, had boxed Tom's ears, and Tom, resenting the insult, had forcibly seated her in the coal-hod, where he held her with one hand while he returned the compliment with the other.
    • 1884, John McGovern, “Wedded Life”, in The Golden Censer: Or, The Duties of To-day, the Hopes of the Future, Chicago, Ill., Columbus, Oh.: Union Publishing House, →OCLC, page 266:
      My friend comes home and finds his dressing-gown and slippers in front of the fire. He is tired and cross, and doesn't want to sling ashes nor bang a coal-hod. But the sight of the fire makes him feel better at once, and if there be no fire, there are no ashes.
    • 1938, Raymond B[artlett] Stevens et al., “Copper Utensils and Hollow or Flat Plate”, in Trade Agreement between the United States and the United Kingdom: Digests of Trade Data with Respect to Products on which Concessions Were Granted by the United States, volume IV, Washington, D.C.: United States Tariff Commission, →OCLC, page 3-42:
      The household uses of copper are principally for cooking utensils and a variety of miscellaneous items, such as urns, bowls, hods, lamps, candlesticks, vases, book ends, and ash trays.
Derived terms
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Translations
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References

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  1. ^ hod, v.”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–present, →OCLC, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC.
  2. ^ hotch, v., n.”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–present, →OCLC, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC.
  3. ^ Compare “hotchen, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  4. ^ Compare hotch, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022; hoach (also hotch), v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  5. ^ hod, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022.
  6. ^ hotter, v., n.”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–present, →OCLC, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC; compare hotter, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022.
  7. ^ hod, n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022; hod, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  8. ^ hotte, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  9. ^ Compare hot, n.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022.

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Czech

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Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology

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Inherited from Old Czech hod, Proto-Slavic *godъ. By surface analysis, deverbal from hodit.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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hod m inan

  1. throw
    hod oštěpem/diskem/kladivem
    javelin/discus/hammer throw
  2. (often in plural) feast day, holy day
    Boží hod vánoční/velikonoční
    Christmas/Easter Day

Declension

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • hod in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • hod in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • hod in Internetová jazyková příručka

Middle English

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old English hād, from Proto-West Germanic *haidu, from Proto-Germanic *haiduz.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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hod (plural hodes)

  1. One's rank level, or, office; one's position in relation to others
  2. A religious or clerical office, position, or calling.
  3. One's state or condition; one's position in relation to their previous position.
  4. (Christianity) The Trinity; the three hypostases making up the Godhead.
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • English: hade, hede (obsolete)
  • Scots: hade (obsolete)
References
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Etymology 2

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Noun

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hod

  1. Alternative form of hood

Old English

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *hōdaz (hood)

Pronunciation

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Noun

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hōd m

  1. hood

Declension

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Descendants

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Old Polish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): (10th–15th CE) /xɔt/
  • IPA(key): (15th CE) /xɔt/

Preposition

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hod

  1. Alternative form of od

Serbo-Croatian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *xodъ, from Proto-Indo-European *sod-.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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hȏd m (Cyrillic spelling хо̑д)

  1. walk, gait
  2. pace

Declension

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Further reading

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  • hod” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovak

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Slovak Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sk

Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *godъ

Pronunciation

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Noun

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hod m inan (genitive singular hodu, nominative plural hody, genitive plural hodov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. throw

Declension

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Further reading

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  • hod”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024