See also: Heer

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain.

NounEdit

heer (plural heers)

  1. A yarn measure of six hundred yards, or 1/24 of a spindle.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch heer, from Middle Dutch hêre, from Old Dutch hērro, hēro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable).

NounEdit

heer (plural here, diminutive heertjie)

  1. gentleman
  2. lord, master
  3. (card games) king
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

heer (plural here, diminutive heertjie)

  1. host, army
Derived termsEdit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɦeːr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: heer
  • Rhymes: -eːr

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch hêre, from Old Dutch hērro, hēro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder). The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with English hoar, Old Norse hárr.

NounEdit

heer m (plural heren, diminutive heertje n)

  1. A lord; master.
  2. A gentleman.
  3. A cleric, notably a Catholic priest.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: heer
  • Negerhollands: heer, here
  • Papiamentu: her (dated)

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch here, from Old Dutch heri, from Proto-West Germanic *hari, from Proto-Germanic *harjaz.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

heer n (plural heren, diminutive heertje n)

  1. (archaic) An army.
    Synonym: leger
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English hǣr.

NounEdit

heer (plural heers)

  1. (anatomy) A hair.

DescendantsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hæra (grey hair).

NounEdit

heer f (definite hera, dative heern)

  1. Matgrass (Nardus stricta).
DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit