Translingual

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Symbol

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ho

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Hiri Motu.

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English ho, hoo (interjection), probably from Old Norse hó! (interjection, also, a shepherd's call). Compare Dutch ho, German ho, Old French ho! (hold!, halt!).

Interjection

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ho

  1. (nautical) Used to attract attention to something sighted, usually by lookouts.
    Sail ho!Another boat is visible!
    Land ho!Land is visible!
    Man ho!A town is visible!
  2. halloo; hey; a call to excite attention, or to give notice of approach.
  3. (rare) Said accompanying a vigorous attack.
    • 1900, Ching Foo, the Yellow Dwarf; Or the Bradys and the Opium Smokers, page 2:
      "I'll hit you again, you thief !” he cried angrily, shaking “Ho-ho-ho!” he croaked.
    • 1955, John Sack, From Here to Shimbashi - Volume 637, page 172:
      It was quite an astonishing show. Colonel Paul Malone of the U.S. Army kept thwacking away with all his might and main, shouting "Ho!"
    • 1999, Mona the Vampire, "Attack of the Living Scarecrow" (season 1, episode 1a):
      Mona: Hee! Ha! Ho! Ha! The brain buffet is closed, buddy! Take that! And this!
    • 2008, Daniel Hellmund, The Answer for Laria, page 93:
      Ho! Take that vile Foresythe!” He snapped his wrist, clicking the stick against the bowed sides of a barrel.
Translations
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Noun

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ho

  1. A stop; a halt; a moderation of pace.
References
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  • 1996, T.F. Hoad, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Etymology, Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Etymology 2

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Pronunciation spelling of whore in a non-rhotic accent with the dough-door merger, which is found in some varieties of African American Vernacular English. Compare mo (more), fo' (for; four). The noun first appears c. 1964, whereas the verb first appears c. 1972.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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ho (plural hos or hoes or heaux)

  1. (slang, derogatory) A whore; a sexually promiscuous woman; in general use as a highly offensive term of abuse for a woman with connotations of loose sexuality.
    Bros before hoes!
    • 2001, “Psycho”, in Toxicity, performed by Serj Tankian with System of a Down:
      So you want to see the show? You really don't have to be a ho.
    • 2006, Noire [pseudonym], Thug-A-Licious: An Urban Erotic Tale, New York, N.Y.: One World, Ballantine Books, →ISBN, page 204:
      They was saying the jawn freaked out and called the cops cause all her sorority sistahs started ragging on her and calling her a stank ho for fucking half the basketball team.
    • 2010, Dennis Shields, God Went Fishing[2], page 69:
      "You looking for one of my ho's?" the diminutive man asked Sigmund.
      "A hoe?" Sigmund asked, wondering why the little man wished to sell him farming equipment in the city.
      "You know, a ho. A tute. A honey, A righteous bit of poontang, my brother," he said.
      "I don't follow," Sigmund said.
      "Indubitably, I means a ho, a whore. I can tell you is a player. You want a whore?" he asked.
  2. (slang, offensive) A woman in general; a bitch.
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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Verb

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ho (third-person singular simple present hoes, present participle hoeing, simple past and past participle hoed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, slang, vulgar) To act as a ho, to prostitute.
    • 2003 November 18, Greywolf Johnson, “Do you know any of these? <g>”, in alt.strange.days[3] (Usenet):
      She holds down a decent job during the day, but is secretly hoeing around with at least 5 different trifling men.

Etymology 3

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From Middle English howe, houwe, hoȝe, from Old English hogu and hoga, from Proto-Germanic *hugô, *hugiz, *huguz (mind, thought, understanding), akin to Old High German hugu, hugi (Middle High German hüge), Old Saxon hugi (Middle Dutch höghe, Dutch heug), Old Norse hugr, Gothic 𐌷𐌿𐌲𐍃 (hugs).

Alternative forms

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Noun

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ho (plural hos)

  1. (obsolete) Care, anxiety, trouble, sorrow.
    • 1567, George Turberville, “A. Sani di Cure Aunsweres”, in Heroycall Epistles of Ovid, 155v:
      Though there bee A thousand cares that heape my hoe.
    • 1798, Charlotte Turner Smith, The Young Philosopher, I. 195:
      Him that..this gentlewoman is in such a hoe about.
    • 1869-70, William Barnes, “The Widow’s House”, in Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect[4]:
      But by day to the zun they must rise
      To their true lives o' tweil an' ov ho.
    • 1875, William Douglas Parish, A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect[5] (at cited word):
      I doänt see as you've any call to putt yourself in no such terrible gurt hoe over it.

Etymology 4

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From Middle English howen, hoȝen, hogien, from Old English hogian, hugian, from Proto-Germanic *hugjaną. Cognate with Middle Scots huik, Old High German hucken, Old Saxon huggjan, Dutch heugen, Old Norse hyggja, Gothic 𐌷𐌿𐌲𐌾𐌰𐌽 (hugjan).

Alternative forms

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Verb

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ho

  1. (obsolete) To care, be anxious, to long.
    • 1787, F. Grose, Provinc. Gloss (at cited word):
      To ho for anything, to long for any thing. Berks.
    • 1847-78, J. O. Halliwell, Dict. Archaic & Provinc. Words:
      Ho...to long for anything; to be careful and anxious. West.
    • 1869-70, William Barnes, The Bells of Alderburnham, Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect:
      But still 'tis happiness to know That there's a God above us; An' he, by day an' night do ho Vor all ov us an' love us.
    • 1874, T. Hardy, Far from Madding Crowd, II. xxiii. 289:
      To ho and hanker after thik woman.
    • 1888, B. Lowsley, Gloss. Berks. Words & Phrases:
      Ho, to long for; to care greatly for.

Anagrams

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Asturian

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Etymology

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Clipping of home

Pronunciation

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Interjection

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ho

  1. friendly interjection used at the end of a phrase when speaking to someone, "bro", "man"
    ¿Sabíes eso, ho?
    Did you know that, man?
    Vamos pa mio casa, ho
    Let's go to my place, man
  2. used closing the sentence to bolster the attention of the listener; emphatic
    ¡Apara yá, ho!
    Stop (it) already, man!

Usage notes

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  • This interjection is used very frequently in Asturian, more than English man or bro, as such when translating to English many instances of "ho" would not be translated.
  • Although "ho" was originally the adult male form, the children equivalent being nin, "ho" is now used extensively for either, without taking into account the receptor's gender or age, while "nin" has largely retained its connotations.
  • "Ho" is usually only used at the end of phrases, "home" is used at the beginning.
Eso ye lo qu'hai de facer, hoThat's what you gotta do, man
Home, eso ye lo qu'hai de facerMan, that's what you gotta do

Breton

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Determiner

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ho (requires hard mutation)

  1. your pl
    ho preudeuryour brothers

Catalan

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin hoc. Compare Occitan o and ac.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ho (enclitic and proclitic)

  1. it (direct object); replaces the demonstrative pronouns açò, això and allò
  2. replaces an independent clause (one which could grammatically form a sentence on its own)
  3. replaces an adjective or an indefinite noun which serves as the predicate of ésser, esdevenir, estar or semblar

Usage notes

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  • Ho cannot be used with either en or hi.
  • ho is the reinforced (reforçada) form of the pronoun. It is used before verbs.
    Ho sabem.We know that.
  • -ho is the full (plena) form of the pronoun. It is normally used after verbs.
    Puc fer-ho.I can do it.
    Deixa-ho.Leave it.

Declension

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Derived terms

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proclictic
enclictic

Chickasaw

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Pronoun

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ho

  1. they

Czech

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ho m or n

  1. accusative of on
    Synonym: jej
  2. accusative of ono

Danish

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Interjection

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ho

  1. (onomatopoeia) Signifies a hearty laugh.

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Esperanto

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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ho (accusative singular ho-on, plural ho-oj, accusative plural ho-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter H/h.

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Interjection

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ho

  1. oh

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Finnish

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Etymology

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Compare Karelian ho. An interjection that is found in many languages.[1]

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈho/, [ˈho̞]
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Syllabification(key): ho

Interjection

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ho

  1. Synonym of oho

References

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  1. ^ Itkonen, Erkki, Kulonen, Ulla-Maija, editors (1992–2000), Suomen sanojen alkuperä [The origin of Finnish words]‎[1] (in Finnish) (online version; note: also includes other etymological sources), Helsinki: Institute for the Languages of Finland/Finnish Literature Society, →ISBN

French

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Pronunciation

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Interjection

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ho

  1. Used by tamers to calm the animal they are taming, especially horses; whoa
    Ho ! Tout doux !Whoa! Easy!
  2. Used to express surprise or shock
    Ho mon Dieu !Oh my God!

Further reading

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Galician

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Etymology

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From home (man).

Pronunciation

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Interjection

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ho!

  1. used closing the sentence to bolster the attention of the listener; emphatic
    Para, ho!Stop!
    Non o volvo facer! Non ho!I'm not doing this again! No way!

References

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  • ho” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • ho” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • ho” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Guaraní

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Pronunciation

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  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Verb

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ho (active, intransitive, irregular)

  1. to go
    Che aháta che rógape.
    I am going home.

Conjugation

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Italian

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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ho

  1. first-person singular present indicative of avere (I have)

References

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  1. ^ ho in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Japanese

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Romanization

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ho

  1. The hiragana syllable (ho) or the katakana syllable (ho) in Hepburn romanization.

Lower Sorbian

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Preposition

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ho

  1. Obsolete spelling of .

Middle English

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Etymology 1

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Probably from Old Norse hó! (interjection, also, a shepherd's call).

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Interjection

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ho

  1. stop, hold
Descendants
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  • English: ho
  • Yola: ho
References
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Etymology 2

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Pronoun

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ho

  1. Alternative form of who (who, nominative)

Etymology 3

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Pronoun

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ho

  1. Alternative form of he (he)

Etymology 4

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Pronoun

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ho

  1. Alternative form of heo (she)

Etymology 5

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Pronoun

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ho

  1. Alternative form of he (they)

Etymology 6

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Noun

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ho

  1. Alternative form of hough (hough, hock)

Etymology 7

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Noun

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ho

  1. Alternative form of hough (promontory)

Etymology 8

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Noun

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ho

  1. Alternative form of oo (one)

Muong

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Pronoun

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ho

  1. (Mường Bi) I; me

Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology

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From Old Norse hon.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ho (accusative henne, genitive hennes)

  1. (nonstandard, dialectal) she (form removed with the spelling reform of 2005; superseded by hun)

Norwegian Nynorsk

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Old Norse hón, from Proto-Germanic *hēnō (compare *ainaz). Cognate with Icelandic hún, Danish hun and Swedish hon.

Alternative forms

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Pronoun

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ho (accusative ho or henne, genitive hennar)

  1. she, it (third person singular, feminine)
    Ho er bestevenninna mi.She is my best friend.
  2. her
    Synonym: henne
    Eg ser ho.I see her.
Usage notes
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Unlike other Scandinavian languages, Nynorsk ho is used to refer not only to feminine persons, but any feminine noun. E.g.: Boka er god. Eg likar ho. (The book is good. I like it.)

In some dialects, ho may precede a female given name or a difinite singular feminine noun. E.g: e(r) ho mang(e) ho klokka no? (what time is it now?); det er ho Stine som kjem jo! (It is Stine who is coming (over there)!)

See also

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Etymology 2

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Alternative forms

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Noun

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ho f (definite singular hoa, indefinite plural hoer, definite plural hoene)

  1. female
    Hoa legg egga oppe i eit tre.The female lays the eggs up in a tree.

References

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Old Irish

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Conjunction

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ho

  1. Alternative spelling of ó

Preposition

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ho

  1. Alternative spelling of ó

Orya

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Noun

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ho

  1. water

References

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Romanian

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Interjection

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ho

  1. Used to calm or stop a domestic animal, especially horses; whoa.
    Ho! Ușor!Whoa! Easy!
  2. (vulgar) Used to calm down a person.
    Ho! Nu mai țipa !Whoa! Stop screaming!

Slovak

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ho

  1. short genitive/accusative singular of on
  2. short genitive/accusative singular of ono

Synonyms

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  • (long form): jeho
  • (prepositional form): neho

Swedish

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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ho c

  1. a trough; a long container for feeding or watering animals.
  2. a sink; often mounted to a wall; especially a kitchen sink or a washing sink.
    Synonym: diskho
Declension
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Declension of ho 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ho hon hoar hoarna
Genitive hos hons hoars hoarnas
Derived terms
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See also

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  • slasktratt (sink (for discharging wastewater))

Etymology 2

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See vem.

Pronoun

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ho

  1. (archaic) who
    • 1541, Gustav Vasa Bible, Esaiah, 40:13-14
      Hoo vnderwisar HERRANS anda/ och hwadh rådhgiffuare lärer honom? Hwem fråghar han om rådh, then honom förstånd giffuer/ och lärer honom rettzens wägh/ och lärer honom klookheet och wijsar honom förståndzens wägh?
      (1873 edition) Ho undervisar Herrans Anda; och hvad rådgifvare lärer honom? Hvem frågar han om råd, den honom förstånd gifver, och lärer honom rättsens väg, och lärer honom klokhet, och viser honom förståndsens väg?
      Who hath directed the Spirit of the Lord, or being his counsellor hath taught him? With whom took he counsel, and who instructed him, and taught him in the path of judgment, and taught him knowledge, and shewed to him the way of understanding?
    Ho äst du?
    Who art thou?
Usage notes
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  • In earlier Swedish, ho was the nominative case form of vem (spelt hvem), corresponding to the difference between English who and whom. Unlike in English, where the oblique form gives way to the nominative, the reverse has happened in Swedish.
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Etymology 3

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See hon.

Pronoun

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ho

  1. (dialectal) Alternative form of hon (she)

Tagalog

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Etymology 1

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Pronunciation

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Particle

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(Baybayin spelling ᜑᜓ)

  1. (familiar) honorific particle used while speaking to one's superior, elder, or guest
    Synonym: po
    Taga-saan naman ho kayo?Where are you from, sir/madam?
Usage notes
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  • The word ho is used more on informal, familiar or conversational contexts than po. On some dialects, this is not observed and may even be more used than po.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Pronunciation

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Interjection

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ho (Baybayin spelling ᜑᜓ)

  1. used to stop a horse, usually repeated
See also
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Further reading

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  • ho”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Tircul

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Pronunciation

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Numeral

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  1. 3 (three)

See also

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Toba Batak

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Etymology

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From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(i-)kahu, compare Malay kau and Tetum ó.

Pronoun

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ho

  1. you

Vietnamese

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Etymology

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From Proto-Vietic *hɔː.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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ho (, 𤵡)

  1. to cough

Derived terms

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Derived terms

Warao

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Noun

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ho

  1. water

Descendants

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References

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Yola

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Etymology

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From Middle English ho, from Old Norse .

Pronunciation

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Interjection

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ho

  1. ho
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 13, page 90:
      Ha-ho! be mee coshes, th'ast ee-pait it, co Joane;
      Hey-ho! by my conscience, you have paid it, quoth John;

Derived terms

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References

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  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 90

Yoruba

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Omi tó ń

Etymology 1

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Pronunciation

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  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Verb

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  1. (transitive, of liquids) to boil
  2. (intransitive, of liquids) to become gaseous, to become boiled
  3. to form bubbles or lather
  4. to roar with noise
    òkún ń yee; ọ̀sà ń mì lẹ̀gbẹ̀The sea was roaring; the lagoon was swaying majestically
Derived terms
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  • bọ́ (to cook in boiling water)

Etymology 2

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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  1. (transitive) to peel off the skin or bark of something
    Synonym:
Derived terms
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Zhuang

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Etymology

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Cognate with Bouyei hol (garlic).

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

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  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Noun

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ho (1957–1982 spelling ho)

  1. garlic
    Synonym: suenq

Derived terms

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