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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ho, hoo (interjection), probably from Old Norse hó! (interjection, also, a shepherd's call). Compare German ho, Old French ho ! (hold!, halt!).

InterjectionEdit

ho

  1. (nautical) Used to attract attention to something sighted, usually by lookouts.
    Sail ho!
    Another boat is visible!
    Land ho!
    Land is visible!
    Man ho!
    A town is visible!
  2. halloo; hey; a call to excite attention, or to give notice of approach
    • Shakespeare
      What noise there, ho?
    • Shakespeare
      Ho! who's within?
    • Shakespeare
      O ho, O ho! Would't had been done!
    • Bishop Joseph Hall
      Ho! all ye females that would live unshent, / Fly from the reach of Cyned's regiment.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

ho

  1. A stop; a halt; a moderation of pace.
    • Decker
      There is no ho with them.
ReferencesEdit
  • 1996, T.F. Hoad, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Etymology, Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Etymology 2Edit

Pronunciation spelling of whore in a non-rhotic accent with the dough-door merger, which is found in some varieties of African American Vernacular English. Compare mo (more), fo' (for; four).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ho (plural hos or hoes)

  1. (slang, derogatory) A whore; a sexually promiscuous woman; in general use as a highly offensive name-calling word for a woman with connotations of loose sexuality.
    Bros before hos!
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English hogu, akin to Old High German hugu, hugi (Middle High German hüge), Old Saxon hugi (Middle Dutch höghe, Dutch heug ), Old Norse hugr, Gothic 𐌷𐌿𐌲𐍃 (hugs). Also spelled hoe.

NounEdit

ho (plural hos)

  1. (obsolete) Care, anxiety, trouble, sorrow.
    • 1567, G. Turberville tr. A. Sani di Cure Aunsweres in tr. Ovid Heroycall Epist. 155v:
      Though there bee A thousand cares that heape my hoe.
    • 1798, C. Smith, Young Philosopher I. 195:
      Him that..this gentlewoman is in such a hoe about.
    • 1869-70, William Barnes, The Widow’s House, Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect:
      But by day to the zun they must rise To their true lives o' tweil an' ov ho.
    • 1875, W. D. Parish Dict. Sussex Dial (at cited word):
      I doänt see as you've any call to putt yourself in no such terrible gurt hoe over it.

Etymology 4Edit

From Old English hogu, a later modification of hycgan. Cognate with Middle Scots huik, Old High German hucken, Old Saxon huggjan (Dutch heugen), Old Norse hyggja, Gothic 𐌷𐌿𐌲𐌾𐌰𐌽 (hugjan). Also spelled hoe.

VerbEdit

ho

  1. (obsolete) To care, be anxious, long.
    • 1787, F. Grose, Provinc. Gloss (at cited word):
      To ho for anything, to long for any thing. Berks.
    • 1847-78, J. O. Halliwell, Dict. Archaic & Provinc. Words:
      Ho...to long for anything; to be careful and anxious. West.
    • 1869-70, William Barnes, The Bells of Alderburnham, Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect:
      But still 'tis happiness to know That there's a God above us; An' he, by day an' night do ho Vor all ov us an' love us.
    • 1874, T. Hardy, Far from Madding Crowd II. xxiii. 289:
      To ho and hanker after thik woman.
    • 1888, B. Lowsley, Gloss. Berks. Words & Phrases:
      Ho, to long for; to care greatly for.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hoc.

PronounEdit

ho (enclitic and proclitic)

  1. it (direct object); replaces the demonstrative pronouns açò, això and allò
  2. replaces an independent clause (one which could grammatically form a sentence on its own)
  3. replaces an adjective or an indefinite noun which serves as the predicate of ésser, esdevenir, estar or semblar

Usage notesEdit

  • Ho cannot be used with either en or hi.

DeclensionEdit

ContractionEdit

Proclictic
Enclictic

ChickasawEdit

PronounEdit

ho

  1. they

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ho m, n

  1. Accusative case of on.
  2. Accusative case of ono.

SynonymsEdit

  • (accusative of on): jej

DanishEdit

InterjectionEdit

ho

  1. (onomatopoeia) Signifies a hearty laugh.

See alsoEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

ho (accusative singular ho-on, plural ho-oj, accusative plural ho-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter H/h.

See alsoEdit

InterjectionEdit

ho

  1. oh

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

ho

  1. Used by tamer to calm the animal they are taming, especially horses; whoa.
    Ho ! Tout doux !
    Whoa! Easy!
  2. Used to express surprise or shock.
    Ho... mon dieu !
    Oh...my God!

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From home (man).

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

ho!

  1. used closing the sentence to bolster the attention of the listener; emphatic
    Para, ho!
    Stop!
    Non o volvo facer! Non ho!
    I'm not doing this again! No way!

ReferencesEdit

  • ho” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • ho” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • ho” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • o (misspelling)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ho

  1. first-person singular present indicative of avere (I have)

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ho

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Lower SorbianEdit

PrepositionEdit

ho

  1. Obsolete spelling of

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronounEdit

ho

  1. who

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English , from Proto-Germanic *hiz (this, this one).

PronounEdit

ho

  1. Alternative form of he

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

PronounEdit

ho

  1. Alternative form of heo

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old English hīe, .

PronounEdit

ho

  1. Alternative form of he

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hon.

PronounEdit

ho (accusative henne, genitive hennes)

PronounEdit

ho

  1. (Non-standard since 2005) she, (third person singular, feminine)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hon.

PronounEdit

ho (accusative ho or henne, genitive hennar)

PronounEdit

ho

  1. she, it (third person singular, feminine)
    Ho er bestevenninna mi.
    She is my best friend.
  2. her
    Eg ser ho.
    I see her.

Usage notesEdit

Unlike other Scandinavian languages, Nynorsk ho is used to refer not only to feminine persons, but any feminine noun. E.g.: Boka er god. Eg likar ho. - The book is good. I like it.

SynonymsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ho f (definite singular hoa, indefinite plural hoer, definite plural hoene)

  1. female
    Hoa legg egga oppe i eit tre.
    The female lays the eggs up in a tree.

ReferencesEdit


OryaEdit

NounEdit

ho

  1. water

ReferencesEdit


SlovakEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ho

  1. short genitive singular of on
  2. short accusative singular of on
  3. short genitive singular of ono
  4. short accusative singular of ono

SynonymsEdit

  • (long form): jeho
  • (prepositional form): neho

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

ho c

  1. a trough; a long container for feeding or watering animals.
  2. a sink; often mounted to a wall; especially a kitchen sink or a washing sink.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of ho 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ho hon hoar hoarna
Genitive hos hons hoars hoarnas

Related termsEdit

PronounEdit

ho

  1. (obsolete) who
  2. (dialectal) she

See alsoEdit


TagalogEdit

ParticleEdit

ho

  1. (Batangas) a honorific particle
    Taga-saan naman ho kayo?
    Where are you from? (when addressing a person of higher status, like elders)

SynonymsEdit

  • (Manila, Standard Tagalog, other dialects) po

VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Vietic *hɔː.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ho (, 𤵡)

  1. to cough

Derived termsEdit

Derived terms

WaraoEdit

NounEdit

ho

  1. water

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


ZhuangEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Bouyei hol (garlic).

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ho (old orthography ho)

  1. garlic