See also: Indo, indo-, -indo, indo', and Indo-

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of indometacin

NounEdit

indo (uncountable)

  1. (slang) indometacin when used as a recreational drug

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of indica

NounEdit

indo (uncountable)

  1. (slang) Cannabis indica, a strain of marijuana.
    • 1995 July 4, “I got 5 on it”, in Operation Stackola[1], performed by Luniz, Michael Marshall (singer):
      [Chorus:Michael Marshall] I got 5 on it (got it, good), grab your 40 let’s get keyed. I got 5 on it, messin’ with that Indo weed.

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

indo

  1. gerund of ir

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From in- + -do; see cre-do for details.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

indō (present infinitive indere, perfect active indidī, supine inditum); third conjugation

  1. I put, set or place into or upon; insert, instill, introduce.
  2. (figuratively) I introduce.
    Synonyms: intrōdūcō, importō, īnserō, addūcō
  3. (figuratively) I impart or give to, apply to, impose on, attach to.
  4. (figuratively) I name after or for, bestow.

ConjugationEdit

   Conjugation of indō (third conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present indō indis indit indimus inditis indunt
imperfect indēbam indēbās indēbat indēbāmus indēbātis indēbant
future indam indēs indet indēmus indētis indent
perfect indidī indidistī indidit indidimus indidistis indidērunt,
indidēre
pluperfect indideram indiderās indiderat indiderāmus indiderātis indiderant
future perfect indiderō indideris indiderit indiderimus indideritis indiderint
passive present indor inderis,
indere
inditur indimur indiminī induntur
imperfect indēbar indēbāris,
indēbāre
indēbātur indēbāmur indēbāminī indēbantur
future indar indēris,
indēre
indētur indēmur indēminī indentur
perfect inditus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect inditus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect inditus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present indam indās indat indāmus indātis indant
imperfect inderem inderēs inderet inderēmus inderētis inderent
perfect indiderim indiderīs indiderit indiderīmus indiderītis indiderint
pluperfect indidissem indidissēs indidisset indidissēmus indidissētis indidissent
passive present indar indāris,
indāre
indātur indāmur indāminī indantur
imperfect inderer inderēris,
inderēre
inderētur inderēmur inderēminī inderentur
perfect inditus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect inditus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present inde indite
future inditō inditō inditōte induntō
passive present indere indiminī
future inditor inditor induntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives indere indidisse inditūrum esse indī inditum esse inditum īrī
participles indēns inditūrus inditus indendus,
indundus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
indendī indendō indendum indendō inditum inditū

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • indo”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • indo”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • indo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

indo

  1. nominative singular of inda (lord)

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈĩ.du/, [ˈĩ.du]

VerbEdit

indo

  1. gerund of ir
    • 2007, J. K. Rowling, Lia Wyler, Harry Potter e as Relíquias da Morte, Rocco, page 244:
      E os meus podem estar indo pelo mesmo caminho!
      And mine may be going through the same way!

SomaliEdit

NounEdit

indo ?

  1. (anatomy) eye

Zayse-ZergullaEdit

NounEdit

indo

  1. mother

ReferencesEdit

  • David Appleyard, Beja as a Cushitic language, in Egyptian and Semito-Hamitic (Afro-Asiatic) Studies: In Memoriam W. Vycichl (Zayse indo "mother")
  • Linda Jordan, A study of Shara and related Ometo speech varieties (Zergulla íːndù "mother"; and compare íːndɑ̀ "woman")