See also: jók

AcehneseEdit

NounEdit

jok

EtymologyEdit

From Malay ijuk.

  1. Arenga plant

VerbEdit

jok

  1. giving

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch jokken. Possibly influenced or reinforced by English joke, but the meaning “to joke” also existed in early modern Dutch.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

jok (present jok, present participle jokkende, past participle gejok)

  1. (intransitive) to fib, to tell (often irrelevant or inconsequential) lies
    Jy moenie jok vir jou ouers!
    You shouldn't fib to your parents!
  2. (intransitive) to joke, to tell jokes
    Jy moenie jok hier, dis 'n serieuse sakedistrik.
    You shouldn't joke around here, this is a serious business district.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch joc. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

NounEdit

jok m (plural jokken, diminutive jokje n)

  1. (uncountable, archaic) jest; frivolous, unserious intent or mood
    Synonyms: gekkigheid, scherts
  2. (countable, archaic) joke, jest, prank
    Synonyms: grap, scherts
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

jok n (plural jokken)

  1. Alternative form of juk.

IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Min Nan (jio̍k, “cotton-padded mattress”).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈd͡ʒɔʔ]
  • Hyphenation: jok

NounEdit

jok (first-person possessive jokku, second-person possessive jokmu, third-person possessive joknya)

  1. cushion.

Further readingEdit


MarshalleseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Micronesian *toko, from Proto-Oceanic *toko.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

jok

  1. to land
  2. to alight
  3. to perch

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

jok

  1. Alternative form of ȝok

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish یوق(yok).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

jȍk (Cyrillic spelling јо̏к)

  1. (colloquial, emphatic) no, nope

SynonymsEdit