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See also: ko'ol

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

kool (comparative kooler, superlative koolest)

  1. (slang) Alternative spelling of cool

Etymology 2Edit

Back slang for look.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

kool (third-person singular simple present kools, present participle kooling, simple past and past participle kooled)

  1. (obsolete, costermongers) To look; to pay attention to with one’s eyes.
    • c. 1864, Stevens, Alfred Peck, “The Chickaleary Cove”, in Farmer, John Stephen, editor, Musa Pedestris[1], published 1896, page 161:
      Now kool my downy kicksies—the style for me, / Built on a plan werry naughty,
    • 1903 October 1, Pierson, Rev. Arthur Tappan, quoting Hogg, Quintin, “Quintin Hogg and the London Polytechnic”, in Missionary Review of the World[2], volume 26, number 16, page 734:
      We had not been engaged in our reading very long when at the far end of the arch I noticed a twinkling light. "Kool esclop!" shouted one of the boys, at the same moment doucing the glim and bolting with his companion, leaving me in the dark with my upset beer bottle and my douced candle, forming a spectacle which seemed to arouse suspicion on the part of our friend the policeman, whose light it was that had appeared in the distance.
    • 2014 October 18, “Golborne Road, Miscellaneous Memories”, in Wordpress[3], retrieved 2017-06-06:
      Kool retfa the posh” he’d call to Mum, “I’m going to ekat the yenom to the kaynab” Somewhere Dad had learnt Backslang and this was the preferred medium of communication between him and Mum when there were customers in the shop. What he had just said was, “Look after the shop, I’m taking the money to the bank”
SynonymsEdit
  • For semantic relationships of this term, see look in the Thesaurus.

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

NounEdit

kool

  1. Hard mutation of gool.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch col, cole, from Old Dutch *kōl, *kōla, from Latin caulis.

NounEdit

kool f (plural kolen, diminutive kooltje n)

  1. cabbage
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch cole, from Old Dutch *kol, *kolo, from Proto-Germanic *kulą, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷol-, from *ǵwelH- (to burn, shine). May originate from a neuter plurale tantum that was reanalysed as a feminine singular; compare Old Norse kol. Cognate with West Frisian koal, German Kohle, English coal, Danish kul.

NounEdit

kool f (plural kolen, diminutive kooltje n)

  1. coal
  2. carbon
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle Low German schôle.

NounEdit

kool (genitive kooli, partitive kooli)

  1. school

DeclensionEdit

CompoundsEdit


Yucatec MayaEdit

VerbEdit

kóol (transitive)

  1. to drag; to pull
  2. to divide, to separate

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

kool (transitive)

  1. to touch, to rub

NounEdit

kool (plural kooloʼob)

  1. field