See also: Cole, colé, and có lẽ

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
Cole
 
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Wikispecies From Middle English cole, col, from Old English cawel, from Germanic, from Latin caulis (cabbage). Cognate with Dutch kool, German Kohl. Doublet of kale.

NounEdit

cole (usually uncountable, plural coles)

  1. Cabbage.
  2. Brassica; a plant of the Brassica genus, especially those of Brassica oleracea (rape and coleseed).
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

cole (plural coles)

  1. (Scotland) A stack or stook of hay.
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), page 39:
      Father saw the happening from high in a park where the hay was cut and they set the swathes in coles, and he swore out Damn't to hell! and started to run []

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

cole

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of colar

Chinook JargonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English cold.

AdjectiveEdit

cole

  1. cold

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

cole

  1. winter
  2. year

AntonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

cole

  1. third-person singular present indicative of colere

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

cole

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of colō

Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡sɔlɛ/, [ˈt͡sɔlə]

NounEdit

cole

  1. inflection of coło:
    1. locative singular
    2. nominative/accusative dual

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

cole

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of colar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of colar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of colar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of colar

NounEdit

cole m (plural coles)

  1. Alternative form of cúli

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin uncertain; possibly from Old French coillir (Modern French cueillir) or Old Norse kollr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cole (plural coles)

  1. (archaic, agriculture) A haycock, hayrick, bundle of straw.

VerbEdit

cole (third-person singular present coles, present participle colein, past colet, past participle colet)

  1. (archaic, agriculture) To put hay in a cole.

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of colegio.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cole m (plural coles)

  1. (colloquial) school
    • 2020 April 26, “Los niños salen por fin de casa: “No me acuerdo de pedalear””, in El País[1]:
      Pero como lo que más echo de menos es el cole, pues he ido con mi padre a ver la puerta del colegio, aunque estaba cerrada y ha sido un poco triste porque tengo muchísimas ganas de ver a mis amigas", cuenta Claudia, de ocho años.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English cold, from Old English cald, from Proto-West Germanic *kald.

AdjectiveEdit

cole

  1. cold

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN