See also: Leid and leið

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

leid

  1. first-person singular present indicative of leiden
  2. imperative of leiden

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German leit from Old High German leid, from Proto-West Germanic *laiþ, whence also English loathe and Old Norse leiðr; also Latin laedō (strike, betray).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

leid (strong nominative masculine singular leider, comparative leider, superlative am leidesten)

  1. (obsolete outside of fixed expressions) distressing, uncomfortable

Usage notesEdit

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • leid” in Duden online
  • leid” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

leid f (genitive singular leide, nominative plural leideanna)

  1. hint, inkling
  2. prompt
  3. pointer, clue

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

leid

  1. past participle of leie

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

leid f (definite singular leidi, indefinite plural leider or leidir, definite plural leiderne or leidine)

  1. (pre-1917) alternative form of lei

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

leid (masculine and feminine leid, neuter leidt, definite singular and plural leide, comparative leidare, indefinite superlative leidast, definite superlative leidaste)

  1. (pre-1917) alternative form of lei

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

leid

  1. (non-standard since 1938) imperative of leida

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *laiþ, whence also Old English lāþ, Old Norse leiðr.

AdjectiveEdit

leid

  1. uncomfortable

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: leit

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From earlier leed, from Middle English lede, reduced form of leden, leoden (language), from Old English lēoden (national language, literally of the people), from lēode (people). More at lede.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

leid (plural leids)

  1. language
Usage notesEdit
  • Commonly understood language, either literally or metaphorically:
    A daena spik the leid.I don't speak the language.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English lede, leed, from Old English lēad (lead (the metal)). More at lead.

NounEdit

leid (plural leids)

  1. lead