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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /leɪt/
  • (file)
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  • Rhymes: -eɪt

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English late, lat, from Old English læt (slow; slack, lax, negligent; late), from Proto-Germanic *lataz (slow, lazy).

AdjectiveEdit

late (comparative later, superlative latest)

  1. Near the end of a period of time.
    It was late in the evening when we finally arrived.
  2. Specifically, near the end of the day.
    It was getting late and I was tired.
  3. (usually not used comparatively) Associated with the end of a period.
    Late Latin is less fully inflected than classical Latin.
  4. Not arriving until after an expected time.
    Even though we drove as fast as we could, we were still late.
    Panos was so late that he arrived at the meeting after Antonio, who had the excuse of being in hospital for most of the night.
  5. Not having had an expected menstrual period.
    I'm late, honey. Could you buy a test?
  6. (not comparable, euphemistic) Deceased, dead: used particularly when speaking of the dead person's actions while alive. (Often used with "the"; see usage notes.)
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      To Edward […] he was terrible, nerve-inflaming, poisonously asphyxiating. He sat rocking himself in the late Mr. Churchill's swing chair, smoking and twaddling.
    Her late husband had left her well provided for.
    The piece was composed by the late Igor Stravinsky.
  7. Existing or holding some position not long ago, but not now; departed, or gone out of office.
    the late bishop of London
    the late administration
  8. Recent — relative to the noun it modifies.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene i], page 23, column 1:
      OLd Iohn of Gaunt, time-honoured Lancaſter,
      Haſt thou according to thy oath and band
      Brought hither Henry Herford thy bold ſon:
      Heere to make good yͤ boiſtrous late appeale,
      Which then our leyſure would not let vs heare,
      Againſt the Duke of Norfolke, Thomas Mowbray?
    • 1914, Robert Frost, North of Boston, "A Hundred Collars":
      Lancaster bore him — such a little town, / Such a great man. It doesn't see him often / Of late years, though he keeps the old homestead / And sends the children down there with their mother []

Usage notesEdit

  • (deceased): Late in this sense is unusual among English adjectives in that it qualifies named individuals (in phrases like the late Mary) without creating a contrast with another Mary who is not late. Contrast hungry: a phrase like the hungry Mary is usually only used if another Mary is under discussion who is not hungry.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

late (plural lates)

  1. (informal) A shift (scheduled work period) that takes place late in the day or at night.
    • 2007, Paul W Browning, The Good Guys Wear Blue
      At about 11 pm one night in Corporation Street my watch were on van patrol and Yellow Watch were on late as usual.

AntonymsEdit

AdverbEdit

late (comparative later, superlative latest)

  1. After a deadline has passed, past a designated time.
    We drove as fast as we could, but we still arrived late.
  2. Formerly, especially in the context of service in a military unit.
    Colonel Easterwood, late of the 34th Carbines, was a guest at the dinner party.
    The Hendersons will all be there / Late of Pablo Fanque's Fair / What a scene!
  3. Not long ago; just now.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 2009 April 3, Peter T. Daniels, "Re: Has 'late' split up into a pair of homonyms?", message-ID <bdb13686-a6e4-43cd-8445-efe353365394@l13g2000vba.googlegroups.com>, alt.usage.english and sci.lang, Usenet.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

late

  1. Inflected form of laat

VerbEdit

late

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of laten

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

late

  1. Feminine plural of adjective lato.

KarelianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to Finnish lattia.

NounEdit

late (genitive lattien, partitive latettu)

  1. floor

LatinEdit

AdverbEdit

lātē (comparative lātius, superlative lātissimē)

  1. broadly, widely
  2. extensively
  3. far and wide, everywhere
  4. lavishly, to excess

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • late in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • late in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the twigs are shooting out, spreading: rami late diffunduntur
    • to have a wide extent: late patere (also metaphorically vid. sect. VIII. 8)

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lát (conduct, demeanour, voice, sound, literally let, letting, loss) (from Proto-Germanic *lētiją (behaviour), from Proto-Indo-European *lēid-, *lēy- (to leave, let). Cognate with Middle Low German lāt (outward appearance, gesture, manner), Old English lǣtan (to let). More at let.

NounEdit

late

  1. Manner; behaviour; outward appearance or aspect.
  2. A sound; voice.
    • c 1275-1499, King Alexander
      Than have we liking to lithe the lates of the foules.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

late

  1. definite singular and plural of lat

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse láta

VerbEdit

late (imperative lat, present tense later, passive lates, simple past lot, past participle latt, present participle latende)

  1. to seem, appear
  2. (also late som) to pretend
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

late

  1. inflection of lat:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

late (present tense lèt, past tense lét, past participle late, passive infinitive latast, present participle latande, imperative lat)

  1. Alternative form of la

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse láta

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

late (present tense lèt, past tense lét, past participle late, passive infinitive latast, present participle latande, imperative lat)

  1. to seem, appear
  2. (also late som) to pretend
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Adverbial form of læt

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

late

  1. late

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

late

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of latir
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of latir

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

late

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of latir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of latir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of latir.

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

late

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of lat.