See also: laß and låss

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English lasse, from Old Norse laskura (an unmarried woman, maiden). Cognate with Scots lassie.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lass (plural lasses)

  1. (archaic in some dialects, informal) A young woman or girl.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:girl
    Coordinate term: lad
    Come and dance, ye lads and lasses!
    • 1952 February, H. C. Casserley, “Permanent Wayfarings”, in Railway Magazine, page 77:
      My audience to this not-too-easy operation was a small group of Scottish school lasses, who seemed (perhaps naturally) to find the proceedings somewhat mysterious, but at any rate amusing. I wished they would go away, but they didn't, so I had to get on with the job to the accompaniment of a background of giggles!
  2. (Geordie, Mackem) A sweetheart.

Usage notes edit

Still prevalent in Scottish English, Irish English, North East England, Lancashire and Yorkshire. Sometimes used poetically in other dialects of English.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

lass

  1. singular imperative of lassen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of lassen

Further reading edit

  • lass” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • lass” in Duden online

Luxembourgish edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German lōs, from Old High German *los, variant of lōs (loose; free; lacking; sly, deceitful). Compare for the short vowel Ripuarian Central Franconian loss, Dutch los. The uninflected stem of this adjective develops regularly into Luxembourgish lass, while the inflected stem yields the doublet lues (slow, quiet). See the English cognate loose for more.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

lass (masculine lassen, neuter lasst, comparative méi lass, superlative am lassten)

  1. loose, unattached

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /lass/
  • Rhymes: -ass
  • Syllabification: lass

Noun edit

lass n

  1. genitive plural of lasso

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Swedish las. Originally the past participle of a verb derived from Proto-Germanic *hlaþaną (to load). Doublet of lada and last.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lass n

  1. load

Declension edit

Declension of lass 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lass lasset lass lassen
Genitive lass lassets lass lassens

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

Yola edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English los, from Old English los.

Noun edit

lass

  1. loss

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

lass

  1. Alternative form of lhose
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 2, page 84:
      Th' valler w'speen here, th' lass ee chourch-hey.
      The more we spend here, the less in the churchyard.

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 52