English

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Lynx lynx

Etymology 1

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From Middle English lusk, from Old English lox, from Proto-West Germanic *luhs, from Proto-Germanic *luhsaz. Cognate with Scots los, Saterland Frisian Luks, Low German Luks, Dutch los, German Luchs, Luxembourgish Luuss.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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los (plural loses)

  1. (obsolete) A medium-sized wildcat, most of them part of the genus Lynx.
    Synonym: lynx
    The los had been brought from a northern part of the United States.
    • 1592, Thomas Thomasius, Thomae Thomasii Dictionarium tertio ... emendatum ... et longe auctius ... redditum.:
      A beaſt like unto a wolfe having many ſpottes, and being exceeding quicke of ſight: a wolfe like an hart, a Los or Lynx.

Etymology 2

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From Middle English los, from Old English los, from Proto-Germanic *lusą, from Proto-Indo-European *lews-.

Noun

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los (plural loses)

  1. Obsolete form of loss.
    • 1673, [Joseph Hill], The Interest Of theſe United Provinces. Being a Defence of the Zeelanders Choice [], Middelburg: Printed by Thomas Berry, page [75]:
      If we come under France, we have not onely Spaine our enimie by Sea and Land (as we have ſhewne) but the los of our Spaniſh Trade, and the hazarding of our whole Levant Traffick: And if we rightly calculate, that amounts to no ſmall part of our Commerce.

Anagrams

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Afrikaans

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Etymology

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From Dutch lossen.

Verb

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los (present los, present participle losende, past participle gelos)

  1. to leave, abandon

Aragonese

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Etymology

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From Latin illos (those ones).

Pronoun

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los

  1. them (masculine direct object)

Synonyms

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Asturian

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Etymology

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From Latin illōs, from ille.

Article

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los m pl (masculine sg el, feminine sg la, neuter sg lo, feminine plural les)

  1. (definite) the

Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Latin illōs; cf. els.

Pronoun

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los (enclitic, contracted 'ls, proclitic els)

  1. them (masculine, direct or indirect object)
    perdoneu-losforgive them
    doneu-los una monedagive them a coin
  2. them (feminine, indirect object only)
    digueu-los la veritattell them the truth
Usage notes
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  • -los is the full (plena) form of the pronoun. It is normally used after verbs ending with a consonant or ⟨u⟩.
Declension
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Etymology 2

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Inherited from Latin illōs, from ille.

Article

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los m pl

  1. masculine plural of lo

Czech

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Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *ȏlsь, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁el-.[1][2] Cognate with English elk, German Elch.

Noun

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los m anim

  1. elk (British), moose (U.S.)
Declension
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from German Los,[3][4] from Middle High German lōz, from Old High German hlōz, from Proto-West Germanic *hlaut, from Proto-Germanic *hlautaz, ablaut variant of *hlutą.

Noun

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los m inan

  1. lottery ticket
Declension
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References

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  1. ^ Jiří Rejzek (2007) “los¹”, in Český etymologický slovník (in Czech), Leda
  2. ^ Machek, Václav (1968) “los 1°”, in Etymologický slovník jazyka českého [Etymological Dictionary of the Czech Language], 2nd edition, Prague: Academia
  3. ^ Jiří Rejzek (2007) “los²”, in Český etymologický slovník (in Czech), Leda
  4. ^ Machek, Václav (1968) “los 2°”, in Etymologický slovník jazyka českého [Etymological Dictionary of the Czech Language], 2nd edition, Prague: Academia

Further reading

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  • los in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • los in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

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Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1

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From Old Norse lauss.

Adjective

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los

  1. loose

Etymology 2

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From Middle Low German los.

Noun

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los c (singular definite lossen, plural indefinite losser)

  1. lynx
Inflection
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Etymology 3

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Derived from verb losse, itself from Middle Low German lossen.

Noun

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los n (singular definite losset, plural indefinite los)

  1. kick
Inflection
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Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Dutch los, from Old Dutch *los, from Proto-West Germanic *lus (a-stem), from Proto-Germanic *lusaz. Cognate with Ripuarian Central Franconian loss, Luxembourgish lass, lues. Related with Dutch loos, the cognate of German los, lose, English loose.

Adjective

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los (comparative losser, superlative meest los or lost)

  1. loose
    De losse kleding zat comfortabel.
    The loose clothing was comfortable.
    Zorg ervoor dat de schroeven goed vastzitten en niet los zijn.
    Make sure the screws are tightly fastened and not loose.
    Het kind hield de ballon stevig vast zodat hij niet los zou vliegen.
    The child held the balloon tightly so that it wouldn't fly loose.
  2. separate, individual
    Dit product is niet bestemd voor losse verkoop.
    This product is not intended to be sold individually.
Inflection
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Declension of los
uninflected los
inflected losse
comparative losser
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial los losser het lost
het loste
indefinite m./f. sing. losse lossere loste
n. sing. los losser loste
plural losse lossere loste
definite losse lossere loste
partitive los lossers
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Berbice Creole Dutch: losi
  • Papiamentu: lòs, los

Verb

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los

  1. inflection of lossen:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Etymology 2

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From Middle Dutch los, from Old Dutch *los, from Proto-Germanic *luhsuz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light, to shine) or from a substrate language.[1]

Cognate with Old Saxon lohs, Old High German luhs, Old English lox, from a similar Germanic form also Swedish lodjur. Cognates outside Germanic include Ancient Greek λύγξ (lúnx), Lithuanian lūšis, Old Church Slavonic рꙑсь (rysĭ), Old Irish lug, Old Armenian լուսանունք (lusanunkʻ).

Noun

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los m (plural lossen, diminutive losje n)

  1. (dated) lynx (specifically the Eurasian lynx, Lynx lynx)
    Synonym: lynx
Alternative forms
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Derived terms
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References

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  1. ^ Philippa, Marlies, Debrabandere, Frans, Quak, Arend, Schoonheim, Tanneke, van der Sijs, Nicoline (2003–2009) “lynx”, in Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands[1] (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press

Anagrams

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Dutch Low Saxon

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Etymology

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From Middle Low German and Old Saxon lōs, from Proto-West Germanic *laus, cognate with Dutch los and English loose.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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los

  1. open

Franco-Provençal

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin illōs.

Determiner

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los m pl

  1. masculine plural of lo (the)

Pronoun

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los m pl (ORB large)

  1. them (third-person plural masculine accusative)

See also

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References

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  • les in DicoFranPro: Dictionnaire Français/Francoprovençal – on dicofranpro.llm.umontreal.ca
  • los in Lo trèsor Arpitan – on arpitan.eu

French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old French los, from Latin laus, probably via the nominative singular form.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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los m (plural los)

  1. (obsolete) praise; acclaim
    Synonym: (modern) louange
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References

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  1. ^ Walther von Wartburg (1928–2002) “laus”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 5: J L, page 211

German

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /loːs/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /lɔs/ (regionally; chiefly as interjection or when meaning “going on”)

Etymology 1

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From Middle High German and Old High German lōs. Compare English loose.

Adjective

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los (strong nominative masculine singular loser, comparative loser, superlative am losesten)

  1. (colloquial or dated) Alternative form of lose (loose)

Adverb

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los (only used in combination with a verb)

  1. rid of, free of
    Ich bin meine Erkältung los.I've gotten rid of my cold.
  2. off, out, used to indicate leaving motion.
    Morgen fahren wir los.Tomorrow we head out.
    Ich muss los.I have to go.
  3. going on
    Hier ist einiges los.There's a lot going on here.
    Was ist los?What's going on? / What's up? / What's wrong?
  4. (colloquial, regional, Westphalia, Lower Saxony) open
    Die Tür stand los.The door stood open.

Interjection

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los

  1. come on!, let's go!
    Los! An die Arbeit!Come on! Let's get to work!
  2. (motor racing) Go!
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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los

  1. singular imperative of losen

Indonesian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈlɔs]
  • Hyphenation: los

Etymology 1

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Shortening from losmen (hostel).

Noun

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los (first-person possessive losku, second-person possessive losmu, third-person possessive losnya)

  1. hostel
  2. longhouse

Etymology 2

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From Dutch loods (pilot).

Noun

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los (first-person possessive losku, second-person possessive losmu, third-person possessive losnya)

  1. (navigation) pilot boat

Etymology 3

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From Dutch los (loose).

Adjective

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los

  1. (colloquial) loose, free
    Synonyms: lepas, bebas

Further reading

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Interlingua

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Pronoun

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los

  1. (accusative, dative) them, those

Ladino

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Etymology

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From Latin illōs, from ille.

Article

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los (singular el, feminine las)

  1. the (masculine plural)

Masurian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Polish los.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈlɔs]
  • Syllabification: los

Noun

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los m inan

  1. fate (presumed cause, force, principle, or divine will that predetermines events)
  2. fate (effect, consequence, outcome, or inevitable events predetermined by this cause)
  3. lottery ticket

Further reading

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  • Zofia Stamirowska (1987-2024) “los”, in Anna Basara, editor, Słownik gwar Ostródzkiego, Warmii i Mazur[3], volume 4, Zakład Narodowy im. Ossolińskich Wydawnictwo Polskiej Akademii Nauk, →ISBN, page 52

Mauritian Creole

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Etymology

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From French loche (dialectal).

Noun

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los

  1. slug

References

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  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. (1987). Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Middle Dutch

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Etymology

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From Old Dutch *los, from Proto-West Germanic *laus (loose, free).

Adjective

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los

  1. loose, free
  2. free, not encumbered
  3. having lost, robbed

Inflection

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Adjective
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative Indefinite los losse los losse
Definite losse losse
Accusative Indefinite lossen losse los losse
Definite losse
Genitive loss losser loss losser
Dative lossen losser lossen lossen

Descendants

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Further reading

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Middle English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old English los.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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los (uncountable)

  1. loss

Descendants

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References

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology

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Borrowing from Low German lots (short form of lotsman); compare with German Lotse.

Noun

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los m (definite singular losen, indefinite plural loser, definite plural losene)

  1. (nautical) a pilot (person who guides ships in and out of a harbour)

References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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los m (definite singular losen, indefinite plural losar, definite plural losane)

  1. Alternative spelling of lós

Etymology 2

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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los n (definite singular loset, indefinite plural los, definite plural losa)

  1. Alternative spelling of lòs

Occitan

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Etymology

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From Latin illōs, from ille.

Pronunciation

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Article

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los (singular lo, feminine la, feminine plural las)

  1. the; masculine plural definite article

Old English

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *lusą (loss), from Proto-Indo-European *lewHs- (to cut loose; sever; lose). Cognate with Old Norse los (looseness; breaking up).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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los n (nominative plural los)

  1. loss
  2. destruction

Declension

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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Old French

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Etymology

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See the verb loer (to laud).

Noun

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los oblique singularm (oblique plural los, nominative singular los, nominative plural los)

  1. glory; positive reputation

Descendants

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Old High German

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *laus, see also Old English lēas, Old Norse lauss.

Adjective

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lōs

  1. loose

Old Polish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Old High German hlōz. First attested in the 14th century.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): (10th–15th CE) /lʲɔs/
  • IPA(key): (15th CE) /lʲɔs/

Noun

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los m inan (related adjective losowy)

  1. (attested in Lesser Poland) lot (thing used for determining chances)
    • 1930 [c. 1455], “Num”, in Ludwik Bernacki, editor, Biblia królowej Zofii (Biblia szaroszpatacka)[4], 33, 54:
      Wyøczsim daycze szirsze a mnyeysim wøssze, wszitkim iakos los przipadnye (ut sors ceciderit)
      [Więcszym dajcie szyrsze a mniejszym węższe. Wszytkim jakoż los przypadnie (ut sors ceciderit)]
    • 1939 [end of the 14th century], Ryszard Ganszyniec, Witold Taszycki, Stefan Kubica, Ludwik Bernacki, editors, Psałterz florjański łacińsko-polsko-niemiecki [Sankt Florian Psalter]‎[5], Krakow: Zakład Narodowy imienia Ossolińskich, z zasiłkiem Sejmu Śląskiego [The Ossoliński National Institute: with the benefit of the Silesian Parliament], pages 21, 19:
      Rozdzelili sobe odzene moie y na odzew moy pusczili loos (super vestem meam miserunt sortem)
      [Rozdzielili sobie odzienie moje i na odziew moj puścili los (super vestem meam miserunt sortem)]
  2. (attested in Lesser Poland) drawing lots (act of determining using lots)
    • 1939 [end of the 14th century], Ryszard Ganszyniec, Witold Taszycki, Stefan Kubica, Ludwik Bernacki, editors, Psałterz florjański łacińsko-polsko-niemiecki [Sankt Florian Psalter]‎[6], Krakow: Zakład Narodowy imienia Ossolińskich, z zasiłkiem Sejmu Śląskiego [The Ossoliński National Institute: with the benefit of the Silesian Parliament], pages 77, 60:
      Y wirzuczil od oblicza gich pogani, y losem rozdzelil gim zemø (sorte divisit eis terram)
      [Y wyrzucił od oblicza jich pogany, i losem rozdzielił jim ziemię (sorte divisit eis terram)]

Descendants

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References

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Polish

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Polish los. Doublet of lotto.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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los m inan (related adjective losowy)

  1. (uncountable) fate (presumed cause, force, principle, or divine will that predetermines events)
  2. (countable) fate (effect, consequence, outcome, or inevitable events predetermined by this cause)
    Synonym: dola
  3. (countable) fate (event or a situation which is inevitable in the fullness of time; destiny)
    Synonym: przeznaczenie
  4. (countable) lot (slip of paper, or less often a die or ball, used in determining a question by chance, or without human choice or will)
    1. lottery ticket
    2. (Middle Polish) gambling
      Synonym: hazard
    3. (Middle Polish, figuratively) trick, ploy, ruse (action intended to deceive or swindle)
      Synonym: sztuczka
  5. (Middle Polish) cut, inheritance, property received by lot
  6. (Middle Polish) person of dialogue

Declension

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Derived terms

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adjectives
adverbs
nouns
proverbs
verbs
verbs

Trivia

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According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), los is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 11 times in scientific texts, 7 times in news, 16 times in essays, 22 times in fiction, and 15 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 71 times, making it the 907th most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[1]

References

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  1. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990) “los”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language]‎[2] (in Polish), volume 1, Kraków, Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 222

Further reading

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Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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los

  1. Alternative form of os (third-person masculine plural objective pronoun) used as an enclitic and mesoclitic following a verb form ending in a consonant (-z, -r and -s, but not -m); the consonant is elided and the preceding vowel takes an accent if necessary

Scots

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle English losse, from Old English lox, from Proto-West Germanic *luhs, from Proto-Germanic *luhsaz. Cognate with English los, Saterland Frisian Luks, Low German Luks, Dutch los, German Luchs, Luxembourgish Luuss.

Pronunciation

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  • (North Northern) IPA(key): /los/

Noun

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los (plural loses)

  1. (obsolete, Middle Scots) lynx

References

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Scottish Gaelic

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Etymology 1

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From Old Irish los, from Proto-Celtic *lustā, from the Proto-Indo-European root *lew- (to divide, to split). Cognate with Welsh llost.

Noun

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los m (genitive singular lois)

  1. purpose, intention
  2. control
  3. (obsolete) tail, end
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Shortening of a los.

Conjunction

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los

  1. in order to

Serbo-Croatian

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Serbo-Croatian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sh
 
Američki los se odmori u kišnom polju.

Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *ȏlsь.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lȍs m (Cyrillic spelling ло̏с)

  1. moose
  2. elk

Declension

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Further reading

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  • los” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Silesian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Polish los.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔs
  • Syllabification: los

Noun

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los m inan

  1. fate (presumed cause, force, principle, or divine will that predetermines events)
  2. lot (slip of paper used in determining a question by chance, or without human choice or will)

Declension

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Further reading

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  • los in silling.org
  • Henryk Jaroszewicz (2022) “los”, in Zasady pisowni języka śląskiego (in Polish), Siedlce: Wydawnictwo Naukowe IKR[i]BL, page 93

Slovene

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Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *olsь.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lọ̑s m anim

  1. elk, moose

Inflection

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The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Masculine anim., hard o-stem
nom. sing. lós
gen. sing. lósa
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
lós lósa lósi
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
lósa lósov lósov
dative
(dajȃlnik)
lósu lósoma lósom
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
lósa lósa lóse
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
lósu lósih lósih
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
lósom lósoma lósi

Further reading

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  • los”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Spanish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Latin illōs accusative plural masculine of ille.

Article

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los m pl

  1. the
    ¿Qué hacen los muchachos?
    What do the boys do?
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Etymology 2

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Pronoun

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los

  1. accusative of ellos and ustedes (when referring to more than one man); them, you all (formal or (Latin America) informal)
  2. plural masculine or neuter pronoun
    los que no hablan
    those who do not speak

See also

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Anagrams

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Swedish

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Noun

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los

  1. indefinite genitive singular of lo

Anagrams

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White Hmong

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Etymology

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From Proto-Hmong-Mien *ləwX (to come back).[1]

Pronunciation

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Verb

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los

  1. to come, return (to one's home or to a place where one resides)
    Synonym: tuaj

Derived terms

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  • los nag (to rain, literally come rain)

References

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  • Heimbach, Ernest E. (1979) White Hmong — English Dictionary[10], SEAP Publications, →ISBN.
  1. ^ Ratliff, Martha (2010) Hmong-Mien language history (Studies in Language Change; 8), Camberra, Australia: Pacific Linguistics, →ISBN, page 276.

Zazaki

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Etymology

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Compare Armenian լոշ (loš).

Noun

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los (genitive singular losi)

  1. lavash