EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /məˈkeɪkəʊ/, /məˈkɑːkoʊ/

Etymology 1Edit

From Portuguese macaco (monkey). Doublet of macaque

NounEdit

macaco (plural macacos or macacoes)

  1. A macaque, or similar monkey.

Etymology 2Edit

From French mococo, probably ultimately from Malagasy maka, maki (lemur).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

macaco (plural macacos or macacoes)

  1. (obsolete) Any of several species of lemurs.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese macaco, possibly from a Bantu language.

NounEdit

macaco m (plural macachi)

  1. macaque
  2. fool, dunce

MirandeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

macaco (plural macacos)

  1. monkey
  2. a person that imitates others
  3. a treacherous, deceitful person

ReferencesEdit

  • “macaco” in Amadeu Ferreira, José Pedro Cardona Ferreira, Dicionário Mirandês-Português, 1st edition, 2004.

PortugueseEdit

 
Macaco

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. Thought to have been borrowed from a Bantu language. Bantu maka, "cat", comes from -mañga (an old East African Bantu word for the sea-coast, often applied to any strange or foreign product). But it seems unlikely that the Bantu would have used such a word to denote familiar animals like apes and monkeys. However, none of the many Bantu words for apes and monkeys resembles "macaco".[1] Other suggested derivations include:

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

macaco m (plural macacos, feminine macaca, feminine plural macacas)

  1. monkey; ape
    Synonyms: símio, mono
  2. mechanical jack
  3. (ethnic slur) coon; porch monkey (derogatory term for a person of Sub-Saharan African ancestry)
  4. (derogatory) ape; savage (an uncivilised or unruly person)
    Synonyms: bárbaro, selvagem
  5. (derogatory) monster; freak (a hideous person)
    Synonyms: monstro, aberração, monstrengo

Usage notesEdit

A distinction is not commonly made between apes and monkeys in Portuguese. Where it is, mono is used for apes and macaco for middle-sized simians.

A more common distinction is made between macacos and micos (small, long-tailed simians).

When used as a ethnic slur directed to black people, it has a strong negative connotation comparable to the English word nigger.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: macaque, macaco
  • Spanish: macaco

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Harry Johnston (1922) A Comparative Study of the Bantu and Semi-Bantu Languages[1], volume 2, pages 245-246
  2. ^ 1955, Antenor Nascentes, Dicionário etimológico da língua portuguesa, 2nd print

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese macaco, possibly from a Bantu language.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /maˈkako/, [maˈka.ko]

NounEdit

macaco m (plural macacos)

  1. macaque
  2. hobgoblin, bogeyman
  3. (South America, derogatory) Brazilian
    Synonyms: brasileño, (colloquial) brasilero
  4. (Louisiana) monkey
    Synonyms: mono, chango, maimón, mico, simio

AdjectiveEdit

macaco (feminine macaca, masculine plural macacos, feminine plural macacas)

  1. (slang) ugly, misshapen, deformed, squat

Further readingEdit