meander

See also: meänder

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Maeander, from Ancient Greek Μαίανδρος (Maíandros) – a river in Asia Minor (present day Turkey) known for its winding course. (Turkish Büyük Menderes Nehri).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /miˈændə(ɹ)/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /miˈændɚ/

NounEdit

meander (plural meanders)

  1. One of the turns of a winding, crooked, or involved course.
    the meanders of an old river, or of the veins and arteries in the body
    • 1712, Sir Richard Blackmore, "Creation: A Philosophical Poem":
      See, how the streams advancing to the main, / Through crooked channels draw their crystal train! / While lingering thus they in meanders glide, / They scatter verdant life on either side.
  2. A tortuous or intricate movement.
  3. (geography) one of a series of regular sinuous curves, bends, loops, turns, or windings in the channel of a river, stream, or other watercourse
  4. Fretwork.
  5. Perplexity.
  6. Synonym of Greek key, a decorative border.
  7. (mathematics) A self-avoiding closed curve which intersects a line a number of times.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

meander (third-person singular simple present meanders, present participle meandering, simple past and past participle meandered)

  1. (intransitive) To wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.
    The stream meandered through the valley.
    • 2020 November 18, Paul Bigland, “New infrastructure and new rolling stock”, in Rail, page 51:
      I'd forgotten how scenic parts of the line are - the railway crosses a host of streams while meandering through meadows or skirting woodland.
  2. (transitive) To wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  • The Chambers Dictionary (1998)

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
 
Meandere i elva Finna, Oppland

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Maeander, from Ancient Greek Μαίανδρος (Maíandros).

NounEdit

meander m (definite singular meanderen, indefinite plural meandere or meandre or meandrer, definite plural meanderne or meandrene)

  1. a meander (in a river)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Maeander, from Ancient Greek Μαίανδρος (Maíandros).

NounEdit

meander m (definite singular meanderen, indefinite plural meandrar, definite plural meandrane)

  1. a meander (in a river)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
 
Zdjęcie lotnicze meandrów rzeki Cauto
An aerial photograph of meanders of the Río Cauto
 
Meander na podłodze tepidarium
A meander on the floor of a tepidarium

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Mäander, from Latin Maeander, from Ancient Greek Μαίανδρος (Maíandros) – a river in Asia Minor (present day Turkey) known for its winding course.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

meander m inan

  1. meander (one of a series of regular sinuous curves, bends, loops, turns, or windings in the channel of a river, stream, or other watercourse)
    Synonym: zakole
  2. meander, meandros (decorative border constructed from a continuous line, shaped into a repeated motif)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

adjectives
noun
verb

Further readingEdit

  • meander in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • meander in Polish dictionaries at PWN