meander

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Maeander, from Ancient Greek Μαίανδρος (Maíandros) – a river in Asia Minor (present day Turkey) known for its winding course. (Turkish Büyük Menderes Nehri)

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /miˈændə(ɹ)/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /miˈændɚ/

NounEdit

meander (plural meanders)

  1. One of the turns of a winding, crooked, or involved course.
    the meanders of an old river, or of the veins and arteries in the body
    • 1712, Sir Richard Blackmore, "Creation: A Philosophical Poem":
      See, how the streams advancing to the main, / Through crooked channels draw their crystal train! / While lingering thus they in meanders glide, / They scatter verdant life on either side.
  2. A tortuous or intricate movement.
  3. (geography) one of a series of regular sinuous curves, bends, loops, turns, or windings in the channel of a river, stream, or other watercourse
  4. Fretwork.
  5. Perplexity.
  6. Synonym of Greek key, a decorative border.
  7. (mathematics) A self-avoiding closed curve which intersects a line a number of times.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

meander (third-person singular simple present meanders, present participle meandering, simple past and past participle meandered)

  1. (intransitive) To wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.
    The stream meandered through the valley.
    • 2020 November 18, Paul Bigland, “New infrastructure and new rolling stock”, in Rail, page 51:
      I'd forgotten how scenic parts of the line are - the railway crosses a host of streams while meandering through meadows or skirting woodland.
  2. (transitive) To wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryton to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • The Chambers Dictionary (1998)

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
 
Meandere i elva Finna, Oppland

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Maeander, from Ancient Greek Μαίανδρος (Maíandros)

NounEdit

meander m (definite singular meanderen, indefinite plural meandere or meandre or meandrer, definite plural meanderne or meandrene)

  1. a meander (in a river)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Maeander, from Ancient Greek Μαίανδρος (Maíandros)

NounEdit

meander m (definite singular meanderen, indefinite plural meandrar, definite plural meandrane)

  1. a meander (in a river)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
 
Zdjęcie lotnicze meandrów rzeki Cauto
An aerial photograph of meanders of the Río Cauto
 
Meander na podłodze tepidarium
A meander on the floor of a tepidarium

EtymologyEdit

From German Mäander, from Latin Maeander, from Ancient Greek Μαίανδρος (Maíandros) – a river in Asia Minor (present day Turkey) known for its winding course.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

meander m inan

  1. meander (one of a series of regular sinuous curves, bends, loops, turns, or windings in the channel of a river, stream, or other watercourse)
    Synonym: zakole
  2. meander, meandros (decorative border constructed from a continuous line, shaped into a repeated motif)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • meander in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • meander in Polish dictionaries at PWN