Translingual

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Symbol

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ag

  1. (metrology) Symbol for attogram, an SI unit of mass equal to 10−18 grams.

English

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Etymology 1

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Clipping of agriculture or agricultural.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ag

  1. (chiefly in compounds) Clipping of agriculture.
    He got his degree from the state ag college.
    My class is over on ag campus.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Clipping of aggregate.

Noun

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ag (countable and uncountable, plural ags)

  1. (construction) Clipping of aggregate (small rocks mixed into concrete).
    The mix should include a good selection of large, medium, and small ag.
    If the mix is too fluid, the ags can sink away from the surface.

Etymology 3

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Borrowed from Afrikaans ag, from Dutch ach.

Pronunciation

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Interjection

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ag

  1. (South Africa) Expressing annoyance, remorse, surprise etc.; oh, ah.
    • 1962, Jeremy Taylor (lyrics and music), “Ag Pleez Deddy”:
      Ag pleez Deddy won't you take us to the wrestling / We wanna see an ou called Sky High Lee
    • 1979, André Brink, A Dry White Season, Vintage, published 1998, page 88:
      Ag, fuck it,’ he said. ‘Let bygones be bygones, man.’
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela, London: Abacus, published 2010, page 491:
      Finally, after placing four books on the desk, he turned to a sheepish Kathy and said, ‘Ag, there's nothing wrong with these desks,’ and walked out.
Derived terms
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Etymology 4

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Adverb

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ag

  1. (stenoscript) Abbreviation of again.

Etymology 5

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Noun

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ag (plural ags)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of AG (aggressive (butch))
    • 2016 February 26, Laura Horak, Girls Will Be Boys: Cross-Dressed Women, Lesbians, and American Cinema, 1908-1934, Rutgers University Press, →ISBN, page 224:
      new forms of female masculinity are exploding, ranging from butches, dykes, and studs to transmen, FTMs, ags, genderqueers, individuals masculine-of-center, and many more. Transgender men and masculine women can make their own movies []
    • 2016 June 10, Roberta Uno, Monologues for Actors of Color: Men, Routledge, →ISBN, page 85:
      I don't know what I'd do without them (smiles) Sometimes, I wonder why studs/ag's/butches/transguys be grilling one another in the club. I mean, in my mind, I'm like Why would you hate someone who look like you, act like you, []
    • 2017 July 31, Eric Friginal, Studies in Corpus-Based Sociolinguistics, Routledge, →ISBN:
      The context around stud enables us to understand its meaning among the W4W advertisers: Seeking lesbian stud, butch, ag, or tomboish women ONLY I'm a single stud (on the soft side) slim body type, tattoos, cute face, and great smile []

Anagrams

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Afrikaans

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Dutch acht.

Noun

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ag (plural agte)

  1. esteem
  2. eight

Etymology 2

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From Dutch achten.

Verb

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ag (present ag, present participle agtende, past participle geag)

  1. to regard; to deem
    Ek ag hom as 'n belangrike bate in ons maatskappy.
    I deem him as an important asset in our company.
    Hy word hoog geag.
    He is highly regarded.
  2. to heed

Etymology 3

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From Dutch ach. Equivalent of German ach and English oh.

Interjection

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ag

  1. oh, oh no, shoot, damn, oh dear

Etymology 4

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Afrikaans numbers (edit)
80
 ←  7 8 9  → [a], [b]
    Cardinal: agt, ag
    Ordinal: agtste, agste
    Ordinal abbreviation: 8ste

Numeral

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ag

  1. Alternative form of agt

Albanian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Albanian *(h)aug-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewg- (compare Ancient Greek αὐγή (augḗ, daylight, splendor), Serbo-Croatian jȕg (south).[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ag m (plural agje, definite agu, definite plural agjet)

  1. dawn, daybreak, predawn light
  2. semi-darkness, fog
  3. shine
  4. pupils
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References

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  1. ^ Demiraj, B. (1997) Albanische Etymologien: Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz [Albanian Etymologies: []] (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 7)‎[1] (in German), Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, page 72

Further reading

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  • “ag”, in FGJSSH: Fjalor i gjuhës së sotme shqipe [Dictionary of the modern Albanian language]‎[2] (in Albanian), 1980
  • Newmark, L. (1999) “ag”, in Oxford Albanian-English Dictionary[3]
  • ag”, in FGJSH: Fjalor i gjuhës shqipe [Dictionary of the Albanian language] (in Albanian), 2006

Buhi'non Bikol

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Conjunction

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ag

  1. and
    Synonym: sagkëd

Indo-Portuguese

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Noun

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ag

  1. water

Further reading

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Irish

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Irish oc, ac, ic, from Old Irish oc, occ. Akin to agus. Compare Scottish Gaelic aig.

Pronunciation

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  • (particle):
    • IPA(key): /ə/ before a consonant
    • IPA(key): /əɡ/ before a, á, o, ó, u, ú
    • IPA(key): /əɟ/ before e, é, i, í
  • (preposition): IPA(key): /ɛɟ/, /ɪɟ/
  • (preposition, Oriel): IPA(key): /ɪɟə/

Particle

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ag

  1. particle used with the verbal noun to mark the progressive aspect:
    ag siúlwalking
    ag gáirelaughing
    ag itheeating
    ag óldrinking

Preposition

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ag (plus dative, triggers no mutation)

  1. at
  2. of, for (after certain adjectives)
    Bhí sé go deas ag Cáit a dhul leat.
    It was nice of Cáit to go with you.
    Tá sé éasca agat sin a rá.
    It’s easy for you to say that.
  3. of (after an indication of quantity)
    Tá go leor acu anseo.
    There are plenty of them here.
    Tá duine againn tinn.
    One of us is ill.
  4. of (to indicate possession emphatically, used after a noun qualified by seo (this) or sin (that))
    an teach seo againnethis house of ours
    na bróga sin agatsathose shoes of yours
  5. used with forms of (to be) to indicate possession in place of a verb meaning ‘have
    Tá teach ag Seán.
    Seán has a house.
  6. used with forms of (to be) and a past participle to indicate a perfect tense
    Tá an teach péinteáilte ag Seán.
    Seán has painted the house.
  7. used with forms of (to be) to indicate ability to do something
    Tá Spáinnis agam.
    I can speak Spanish.
    Tá caint agam.
    I can talk.
    Tá ceol agam.
    I can make music.
Inflection
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Etymology 2

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Reduced form of chuig, assimilated in all forms to Etymology 1.

Pronunciation

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  • (preposition): IPA(key): /ɛɟ/

Preposition

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ag (plus dative, triggers no mutation)

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of chuig (to (a person or place))
    Tá mé ag dul ag an dochtúr.
    I’m going to the doctor
Inflection
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Descendants
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  • Yola: ug

Further reading

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Kaingang

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ag

  1. they; them (masculine)

Particle

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ag

  1. masculine plural marker
    Topẽ vỹ ẽprã ke ag to há nĩ.
    God loves the human beings.

Korlai Creole Portuguese

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Etymology

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From Portuguese água.

Noun

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ag

  1. water

Further reading

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  • J. Clancy Clements, The Genesis of a Language: The Formation and Development of Korlai Portuguese, page 94, 1996

Old Irish

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Etymology

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From Proto-Celtic *agos (cow), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eǵHos. Compare Old Armenian եզն (ezn), Sanskrit अही (ahī́).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ag n

  1. bullock, cow, ox
  2. deer, stag

Inflection

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Neuter s-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative agN agN aigeL
Vocative agN agN aigeL
Accusative agN agN aigeL
Genitive aigeL aige aigeN
Dative aigL aigib aigib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants

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  • Irish: agh
  • Scottish Gaelic: agh ‘heifer’

Mutation

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Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ag
(pronounced with /h/ in h-prothesis environments)
unchanged n-ag
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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Parauk

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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ag

  1. crossbow (bow).
  2. arrow.

Noun

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ag

  1. carbuncle, ulcer, tumor.

Scots

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Derived from Old Norse eggja.

Noun

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ag (plural ags) (Shetland)

  1. The wash of waves on the sea-shore as by a steady wind from the sea.
  2. foam near the shore
  3. stir, eagerness

Etymology 2

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Verb

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ag (third-person singular simple present ags, present participle agin, simple past aged, past participle aged)

  1. Shetland form of agg (to drive)

Etymology 3

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Verb

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ag (third-person singular simple present ags, present participle agin, simple past aged, past participle aged)

  1. Shetland form of ak (to feel sick)

References

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Scottish Gaelic

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Pronunciation

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IPA(key): /aɡ/

Etymology 1

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Contraction of aig

Particle

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ag

  1. Used before the verbal noun to form the present participle.
    Bha Seumas ag obair.James was working.
Usage notes
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  • This is the form used before a vowel. Before consonants it contracts to a'. The sole exception is ag ràdh (saying).

Etymology 2

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

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ag m (genitive singular agaig or aig, no plural)

  1. doubt
  2. hesitation

Verb

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ag (past dh'ag, future agidh, verbal noun agadh)

  1. hesitate
  2. doubt

Mutation

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Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ag n-ag h-ag t-ag
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Swedish

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Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv
 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology

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From Old Swedish ag, agh (Cladium).

Noun

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ag c

  1. grass of the genus Cladium
    1. especially, of species Cladium mariscus (great fen-sedge, swamp sawgrass).
  2. various sedges and rushes outside genus Cladium, e.g. in genera Juncus (rushes) and Schoenus (bog rushes)
    Synonym: tåg (Juncus)

Declension

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Declension of ag 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ag agen agar agarna
Genitive ags agens agars agarnas

Anagrams

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Volapük

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Interjection

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ag!

  1. oh! cry of pain or surprise
  2. ah! cry of surprise

Welsh

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Preposition

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ag

  1. with (used before vowels)

Usage notes

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Unlike â, ag does not cause an aspirate mutation in the following word.

Wolof

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Preposition

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ag

  1. with