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EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒn

Etymology 1Edit

From Japanese (mon). Cognate to wen, mun and van.

NounEdit

mon

  1. The former currency of Japan until 1870, before the yen.
  2. The badge or emblem a Japanese family, especially a family of the ancient feudal nobility; typically circular and consists of conventionalized forms from nature.

Etymology 2Edit

From a dialectal variant of man; compare Western Middle English mon (alongside Eastern man).

NounEdit

mon

  1. (slang, used in the vocative) A colloquial means of address of man in places such as Jamaica and Shropshire in England.

See alsoEdit

  • (term of address for a man) mate (British, Australia), dude

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of monster, via Japanese モン (mon) in Pokémon, Digimon etc.

NounEdit

mon (plural mons)

  1. (fandom slang) A creature in a video game, usually one which is captured, trained up and used in battles.
    • 2000 November 25, Thomas Conner, “Digimon Top Ten Choice List”, in alt.fan.digimon, Usenet[1]:
      Here they are, the fans voted for them, and here they are, the Mons that can...
    • 2003 February 15, sirSTACK, “Digimon #429”, in alt.fan.digimon, Usenet[2]:
      When a mon attacks him, he returns the same strike with the world "Reflection" after it, double the original strength.
    • 2011 June 6, Clayton, “PW! - Training Interlude”, in alt.games.nintendo.pokemon, Usenet[3]:
      And thus did it come to pass that the boy and the two mons, after a brief final discussion began the training.
  2. (fandom slang) A video game or anime in which catching and battling creatures is an important element.
    • 2001 May 27, Travis Anton, “Cigarette Smoke”, in alt.home.repair, Usenet[4]:
      Pokemon, digimon and all other merchandised mons, what good parent will disagree with me that those little invading, mind rotting things should be tolerated... those should be illegal, too...
    • 2001 May 24, Horace Wachope, “Kids Toys”, in alt.ozdebate, Usenet[5]:
      And dont buy Pokemon or Digimon or any other bloody Mons or you will never hear the ned of it :-)
    • 2003 December 9, tito, “Main difference between anime an U.S. cartoons?”, in rec.arts.anime.misc, Usenet[6]:
      At any rate Digimon was the best mon/collector series we've seen yet, to the point its popularity was prolly bigger here than its marketing.

AnagramsEdit


BavarianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German man, from Old High German man, from Proto-Germanic *mann-. Cognate with German Mann, Dutch man, English man, Icelandic maður, Swedish man, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽𐌰 (manna).

NounEdit

mon

  1. (Sauris) man
  2. (Sauris) husband

ReferencesEdit

  • “mon” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan mon, from Vulgar Latin mum, reduced form of Latin meus, meum, from Proto-Italic *meos. Compare Occitan and French mon.

In unstressed position in Vulgar Latin meum, meam etc. were monosyllabic and regularly became mon, ma etc. in Catalan. When stressed they were disyllabic and became meu, mia > meua etc.

DeterminerEdit

mon m (feminine ma, masculine plural mos, feminine plural mes)

  1. my

Usage notesEdit

The use of mon and the other possessive determiners is mostly archaic in the majority of dialects, with articulated possessive pronouns (e.g. el meu) mostly being used in their stead. However, mon, ton, and son are still widely used before certain nouns referring to family members and some affective nouns, such as amic, casa, and vida. Which nouns actually find use with the possessive determiners depends greatly on the locale.

The standard masculine plural form is mos, but mons can be found in some dialects.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

AdverbEdit

mon

  1. I wonder
    Mon luftmodstanden kan være betydningsfuld?
    Might air resistance be significant, I wonder?
    Nå, mon ikke de snart er færdige.
    Er det mon bare et spørgsmål om at opskrive alle tilfælde, og så udstrege alle de umulige?
    I wonder if if it is just a matter of enumerating all cases, and then excluding the impossible ones?

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French mon, from Old French mun, mon, meon, from Vulgar Latin, Late Latin mum, a reduced variant of Latin meum, nominative masculine and neuter singular of meus.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

mon m (singular)

  1. (possessive) my (used to qualify masculine nouns and vowel-initial words regardless of gender).
    J'ai perdu mon chapeau.
    I lost my hat.
    La décision a été prise pendant mon absence.
    The decision was taken in my absence.
  2. Followed by rank, obligatory way of addressing a (male) superior officer within the military. (Folk etymology: military-specific short for "monsieur".)

Related termsEdit

Possessee
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine
Possessor Singular First person mon1 ma mes
Second person ton1 ta tes
Third person son1 sa ses
Plural First person notre nos
Second person votre2 vos2
Third person leur leurs
1 Also used before feminine adjectives and nouns beginning with a vowel or mute h.
2 Also used as the polite singular form.


Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Guinea-Bissau CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese mão. Cognates with Kabuverdianu mon.

NounEdit

mon

  1. hand

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

mon

  1. Rōmaji transcription of もん

KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese mão.

NounEdit

mon

  1. hand

KalashaEdit

NounEdit

mon

  1. a language

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-, from Proto-Indo-European *mon-.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mon (plural men)

  1. man (male human)
  2. human, person
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

mon

  1. Alternative form of man
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

mon

  1. Alternative form of mone (moon)
ReferencesEdit

Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈmon/

PronounEdit

mon

  1. nominative of mun

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan mon, from Vulgar Latin mum, a reduced variant of Latin meum.

DeterminerEdit

mon m sg (feminine singular ma, masculine plural mos, feminine plural mas)

  1. my
    Synonyms: meu, mieu

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • moun (Anglo-Norman)
  • mun (Anglo-Norman)
  • meon (very early Old French; Oaths of Strasbourg)

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin, Late Latin mum, a reduced variant of Latin meum, nominative neuter singular of meus.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

mon m (feminine ma, plural mes)

  1. my (first-person singular possessive)

DescendantsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin, Late Latin mum, a reduced variant of Latin meum, nominative neuter singular of meus.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mon m (feminine ma)

  1. my (belonging to me)

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin mundus.

NounEdit

mon m (oblique plural mons, nominative singular mons, nominative plural mon)

  1. world
    • circa 1145, Bernard de Ventadour, Anc no gardei sazo ni mes:
      Tota gens ditz que Vianes
      Es la melher terra del mon
      Everyone says that Vianes
      is the best land in the world

DescendantsEdit


ScotsEdit

NounEdit

mon

  1. man

Skolt SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Samic *monë.

PronounEdit

mon

  1. I

Further readingEdit

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[7], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

mon

  1. definite singular of mo

Tok PisinEdit

NounEdit

mon

  1. tree that bears fruit or nuts

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

mon (uncountable mons)

  1. money

DeclensionEdit