See also: néctar

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin nectar, from Ancient Greek νέκταρ (néktar, nourishment of the gods), from Proto-Indo-European *neḱ- (perish, disappear) + *-tr̥h₂ (overcoming), from *terh₂- (to overcome, pass through, cross over).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈnɛk.tə/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈnɛk.təɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛktə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: nec‧tar

NounEdit

nectar (countable and uncountable, plural nectars)

  1. (chiefly mythology) The drink of the gods. [from 16th c.]
  2. (by extension) Any delicious drink, now especially a type of sweetened fruit juice. [from 16th c.]
  3. (botany) The sweet liquid secreted by flowers to attract pollinating insects and birds. [from 17th c.]

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

nectar (third-person singular simple present nectars, present participle nectaring, simple past and past participle nectared)

  1. (intransitive) To feed on nectar.
    • 2010, Robert Michael Pyle, Mariposa Road: The First Butterfly Big Year (page 123)
      On the lane below, more orangetips nectared on spring beauties and violets.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nectar m (plural nectars)

  1. (Greek mythology, Roman mythology) nectar, beverage drunk by the Olympians
    Synonym: godendrank
    Coordinate term: ambrozijn
  2. (botany, insects) nectar, liquid produced by flowers

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nectar, from Ancient Greek νέκταρ (néktar), from Proto-Indo-European *néḱtr̥h₂, derived from the roots *neḱ- (to perish, disappear) and *terh₂- (to overcome).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nectar m (plural nectars)

  1. nectar (all meanings)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Turkish: nektar

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek νέκταρ (néktar), from Proto-Indo-European *néḱ-tr̥h₂, derived from the roots *neḱ- (to perish) and *terh₂- (to overcome).

NounEdit

nectar n sg (genitive nectaris); third declension

  1. nectar
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative nectar
Genitive nectaris
Dative nectarī
Accusative nectar
Ablative nectare
Vocative nectar
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • nectar”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • nectar”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nectar”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nectar”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

nectar

  1. first-person singular future passive indicative of nectō

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek νέκταρ (néktar) or French nectar.

NounEdit

nectar n (plural nectaruri)

  1. nectar

DeclensionEdit