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See also: néctar

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin nectar, from Ancient Greek νέκταρ (néktar, nourishment of the gods), from Proto-Indo-European *neḱ- (perish, disappear) + *-tr̥h₂ (overcoming), from *terh₂- (to overcome, pass through, cross over).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈnɛk.tə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈnɛk.təɹ/
  • Hyphenation: nec‧tar

NounEdit

nectar (countable and uncountable, plural nectars)

  1. (chiefly mythology) The drink of the gods. [from 16th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.4:
      They pourd in soveraine balme and Nectar good, / Good both for erthly med'cine and for hevenly food.
  2. (by extension) Any delicious drink, now especially a type of sweetened fruit juice. [from 16th c.]
  3. (botany) The sweet liquid secreted by flowers to attract pollinating insects and birds. [from 17th c.]

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

nectar (third-person singular simple present nectars, present participle nectaring, simple past and past participle nectared)

  1. (intransitive) To feed on nectar.
    • 2010, Robert Michael Pyle, Mariposa Road: The First Butterfly Big Year (page 123)
      On the lane below, more orangetips nectared on spring beauties and violets.

ReferencesEdit

[1]

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

nectar m (plural nectars)

  1. (Greek mythology, Roman mythology) nectar, beverage drunk by the Olympians
    Synonym: godendrank
    Coordinate term: ambrozijn
  2. (botany, insects) nectar, liquid produced by flowers

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nectar, from Ancient Greek νέκταρ (néktar), from Proto-Indo-European *néḱtr̥h₂, derived from the roots *neḱ- (to perish, disappear) and *terh₂- (to overcome).

NounEdit

nectar m (plural nectars)

  1. nectar (all meanings)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek νέκταρ (néktar), from Proto-Indo-European *néḱ-tr̥h₂, derived from the roots *neḱ- (to perish) and *terh₂- (to overcome).

NounEdit

nectar n (genitive nectaris); third declension

  1. nectar
InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter “pure” i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative nectar nectaria
Genitive nectaris nectarium
Dative nectarī nectaribus
Accusative nectar nectaria
Ablative nectarī nectaribus
Vocative nectar nectaria
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • nectar in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • nectar in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nectar in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nectar in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

nectar

  1. first-person singular future passive indicative of nectō