perk

See also: pērk

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From perquisite, by abbreviation.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

perk ‎(plural perks)

  1. (informal) Perquisite.
    Free coffee is one of the perks of the job.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From percolate (verb) and percolator (noun), by abbreviation.

VerbEdit

perk ‎(third-person singular simple present perks, present participle perking, simple past and past participle perked)

  1. Shortened form of percolate.

NounEdit

perk ‎(plural perks)

  1. A percolator, particularly of coffee.

Etymology 3Edit

The origin is uncertain.

VerbEdit

perk ‎(third-person singular simple present perks, present participle perking, simple past and past participle perked)

  1. To become more lively or enthusiastic.
  2. To exalt oneself; to bear oneself loftily.
    • Barrow
      to perk over them
  3. To make trim or smart; to straighten up; to erect; to make a jaunty or saucy display of.
    to perk the ears; to perk up one's head
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowper to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sherburne to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

perk ‎(comparative more perk, superlative most perk)

  1. smart; trim; spruce; jaunty; vain
    • Spenser
      Perk as a peacock.

Etymology 4Edit

The origin is uncertain.

VerbEdit

perk ‎(third-person singular simple present perks, present participle perking, simple past and past participle perked)

  1. (dated) To peer; to look inquisitively.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Charles Dickens to this entry?)

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *perrik, *parrik, from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz. Compare also park and German Pferch.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

perk n ‎(plural perken, diminutive perkje n)

  1. a delimited piece of ground, e.g. a flowerbed
Read in another language