See also: Park

EnglishEdit

 
Charles Bond Park, Yinnar, Victoria, Australia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English park, from Old French parc (livestock pen), from Medieval Latin parcus, parricus, from Frankish *parrik (enclosure, pen), from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz (enclosure, fence). Cognate with Dutch perk (enclosure; flowerbed), Old High German pfarrih, pferrih (enclosure, pen), Old English pearroc (enclosure) (whence modern English paddock), Old Norse parrak, parak (enclosure, pen; distress, anxiety), Icelandic parraka (to keep pent in, under restraint and coercion). More at parrock, paddock.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

park (plural parks)

  1. An area of land set aside for environment preservation or recreation.
    1. A tract of ground kept in its natural state, about or adjacent to a residence, such as for the preservation of game, for walking, riding, or the like.
      • 17th century, Edmund Waller, At Penshurst
        While in the park I sing, the listening deer / Attend my passion, and forget to fear.
    2. A piece of ground in or near a city or town, enclosed and kept for ornament and recreation.
      Hyde Park in London;  Central Park in New York
      • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
        If the afternoon was fine they strolled together in the park, very slowly, and with pauses to draw breath wherever the ground sloped upward. The slightest effort made the patient cough.
      • 1994, Robert Ferro,The Blue Star:
        I roamed the streets and parks, as far removed from the idea of art and pretense as I could take myself, discovering there the kind of truth I was supposed to be setting down on paper…
    3. An enclosed parcel of land stocked with animals for hunting, which one may have by prescription or royal grant.
  2. (US) A wide, flat-bottomed valley in a mountainous region.
    • 1878, The San Francisco Western Lancet. a Journal of Practical Medicine and Surgery, volume 7, number 3:
      The mountain region thus limited consists of extensive and often level-floored valleys, sometimes many miles broad, and elevated 4,000 to 5,000 feet above the sea, called "parks" in local topography, which are interposed between innumerable rocky mountain ridges ....
    • 1895, Whitman Cross, Richard Alexander Fullerton Penrose, Geology and Mining Industries of the Cripple Creek District, Colorado, page 54:
      High Park is a depression of 10 or 12 square miles in extent [] at a general elevation of 7,500 feet. Its smooth floor is partly due to volcanic tuff of the western volcanic area, but chielfly to a find lake-bed deposit of yellowish sandstone....
    • 1897, The Colliery Engineer, volume 17, page 207:
      The so-called park is a very broad, open valley,between the Sangre de Cristo range on the east, and the volcanic San Juan and Conejos ranges on the west
    • 1911, Edward W. Harnden, “A Western Mountaineering Summer”, in Appalachia, volume XII, number 3:
      ...the ridges flatten and, higher up, before reaching the upper snow-fields of the mountain, broaden out into high plateaus, the beautiful so-called parks or meadows.
    • 1975, Frits Van der Leeden, Lawrence A. Cerrillo, David William Miller, Ground-water pollution problems in the Northwestern United States:
      Several structural basins, so-called "parks" within the crystalline rocks, are underlain by alluvial and terrace deposits, and in some cases, by Tertiary sediments.
  3. An area used for specific purposes.
    1. An open space occupied by or reserved for vehicles, matériel or stores.
      a wagon park;   an artillery park
    2. A partially enclosed basin in which oysters are grown.
    3. An area zoned for a particular (industrial or commercial) purpose.
      business park;  industrial park;  science park
      • 2013 June 21, Chico Harlan, “Japan pockets the subsidy …”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 2, page 30:
        Across Japan, technology companies and private investors are racing to install devices that until recently they had little interest in: solar panels. Massive solar parks are popping up as part of a rapid build-up that one developer likened to an "explosion."
    4. An area on which a sporting match is played; (soccer) a pitch.
      • 2010 December 28, Owen Phillips, “Sunderland 0-2 Blackpool”, in BBC:
        But because of their dominance in the middle of the park and the sheer volume of chances, Sunderland boss Steve Bruce must have been staggered and sickened in equal measure when the visitors took the lead five minutes after the break.
  4. (Britain) An inventory of matériel.
    A country's tank park or artillery park.
  5. (Australia, New Zealand) A space in which to leave a car; a parking space.
    • 2003, “Johnny”, Melbourne Blackout, in Sleazegrinder (editor), Gigs from Hell: True Stories from Rock and Roll′s Frontline, page 174,
      We got to the 9th Ward and as luck would have it I found a park for my bro′s car right out the front.
    • 2010, Sandy Curtis, Dangerous Deception, Clan Destine Press, Australia, unnumbered page,
      Once they′d entered the floors of parking spaces, James found a park relatively easily, but Mark had difficulty, and only a swift sprint allowed him to catch up as James walked through the throngs of people in the casino with the determination of a man who didn′t want to be delayed.
    • 2011, Antonia Magee, The Property Diaries: A Story of Buying a House, Finding a Man and Making a Home … All on a Single Income!, John Wiley & Sons Australia, unnumbered page,
      We finally found a park and walked a few blocks to the building.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

terms derived from park (noun)
place names derived from park (noun)

DescendantsEdit

  • Georgian: პარკი (ṗarḳi)
  • Irish: páirc
  • Japanese: パーク (pāku)
  • Scottish Gaelic: pàirc
  • Welsh: parc

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

park (third-person singular simple present parks, present participle parking, simple past and past participle parked)

  1. (transitive) To bring (something such as a vehicle) to a halt or store in a specified place.
    You can park the car in front of the house.
    I parked the drive heads of my hard disk before travelling with my laptop.
  2. (transitive, informal) To defer (a matter) until a later date.
    Let's park that until next week's meeting.
  3. (transitive) To bring together in a park, or compact body.
    to park artillery, wagons, automobiles, etc.
  4. (transitive) To enclose in a park, or as in a park.
    • 1592, William Shakespeare, The First Part of King Henry the Sixth
      O, negligent and heedless discipline!
      How are we park'd and bounded in a pale,
      A little herd of England's timorous deer,
      Mazed with a yelping kennel of French curs!
  5. (transitive, baseball) To hit a home run, to hit the ball out of the park.
    He really parked that one.
  6. (intransitive, slang) To engage in romantic or sexual activities inside a nonmoving vehicle that was driven to a suitable spot for that purpose.
    They stopped at a romantic overlook, shut off the engine, and parked.
    • 1956, Grace Metalious, Peyton Place, page 199:
      "What did you do after that?" he asked. - "Went parking over at Silver Lake," replied Betty without hesitation. "Why?" - "I just wondered. Have fun?" "As a matter of fact, I did. Marty's a swell dancer." "That's not what I meant." "What did you mean?" - "I mean after. Parking." - "Yes I did [] "
    • 1968, Records & Briefs New York State Appellate Division, page 861:
      A. Well, I had heard that it was used for parking place, but I never went parking there. Q. Excuse me? A. I had heard that it had been used for a parking place, but I had never gone parking there. Q. When you say “Parking place,” what do you mean? A. With a guy and a girl.
    • 1996, Joseph Tropiano, ‎Stanley Tucci, Big Night: A Novel with Recipes, page 37:
      The Phyllis and me go "parking." This is a very American thing to me, this "parking,” but Phyllis says that this is what couples in this country do when they are dating. We can't go to her house because her parents are there which is okay with me. / We are parking on a quiet street and we get in the backseat of my car. We begin to kiss and I start to feel her body.
    • 2001, Tamyra Horst, Ratty Bathrobes, Cranky Kids, and Other Romantic Moments, page 47:
      Tim and I never went parking when we were dating, but now that we've been married, it's been a fun date once in a while. (OK, we never actually leave the driveway, but the car was still parked.)
    • 2001, James Patterson, Violets Are Blue:
      They were parking out near the hills. It's a popular spot for submarine races. They went for a little moonlit stroll. I'm sure they had nightmares after what they saw. Mary Alice was hanging from a tree by her bare feet. Naked.
    • 2008, Tim McLoughlin, ‎Thomas Adcock, Brooklyn Noir 3: Nothing But the Truth:
      They had gone to see the Robert De Niro/Liza Minnelli flick, New York, New York, before driving back to Bensonhurst and parking on a quiet street. As they kissed, Berkowitz opened fire
  7. (transitive, informal, sometimes reflexive) To sit, recline, or put, especially in a manner suggesting an intent to remain for some time.
    He came in and parked himself in our living room.
    Park your bags in the hall.
  8. (transitive, finance) To invest money temporarily in an investment instrument considered to relatively free of risk, especially while awaiting other opportunities.
    We decided to park our money in a safe, stable, low-yield bond fund until market conditions improve.
  9. (Internet) To register a domain name, but make no use of it (See domain parking)
  10. (transitive, oyster culture) To enclose in a park, or partially enclosed basin.
  11. (intransitive, dated) To promenade or drive in a park.
  12. (intransitive, dated, of horses) To display style or gait on a park drive.

AntonymsEdit

(bring to a halt): unpark

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

NounEdit

park ?

  1. field

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French parc.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /paːrk/, [pʰɑːɡ̊]

NounEdit

park c (singular definite parken, plural indefinite parker)

  1. park

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch parc, from Old Dutch *parruk, from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz (enclosure, fence). Doublet of perk.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

park n (plural parken, diminutive parkje n)

  1. park

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: park
  • German: Park (partially)
    • Lower Sorbian: park
  • West Frisian: park

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

park

  1. singular imperative of parken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of parken

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

park (plural parkok)

  1. park

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative park parkok
accusative parkot parkokat
dative parknak parkoknak
instrumental parkkal parkokkal
causal-final parkért parkokért
translative parkká parkokká
terminative parkig parkokig
essive-formal parkként parkokként
essive-modal
inessive parkban parkokban
superessive parkon parkokon
adessive parknál parkoknál
illative parkba parkokba
sublative parkra parkokra
allative parkhoz parkokhoz
elative parkból parkokból
delative parkról parkokról
ablative parktól parkoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
parké parkoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
parkéi parkokéi
Possessive forms of park
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. parkom parkjaim
2nd person sing. parkod parkjaid
3rd person sing. parkja parkjai
1st person plural parkunk parkjaink
2nd person plural parkotok parkjaitok
3rd person plural parkjuk parkjaik

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • park in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Park, from Old French parc (livestock pen), from Medieval Latin parcus, parricus, from Frankish *parric (enclosure, pen), from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz (enclosure, fence).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

park m

  1. park (piece of ground, in or near a city or town, enclosed and kept for ornament and recreation)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French park.

NounEdit

park (plural parks)

  1. enclosure

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin parricus, via French parc

NounEdit

park m (definite singular parken, indefinite plural parker, definite plural parkene)

  1. a park (preserved green open space, usually open to the public)

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin parricus, via French parc

NounEdit

park m (definite singular parken, indefinite plural parkar, definite plural parkane)

  1. a park (as above)

Derived termsEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

park m inan

  1. park (e.g., a ground for recreation in a city or town)
  2. (obsolete) A scent released by goats, deer, or hares during breeding periods.
  3. (obsolete) Breeding period of goats, deer, or hares.

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • park in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pȁrk m (Cyrillic spelling па̏рк)

  1. park

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse parrak, from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

park c (plural parker, definite singular parken, definite plural parkerna)

  1. park (in a city)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of park 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative park parken parker parkerna
Genitive parks parkens parkers parkernas

AnagramsEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French parc.

NounEdit

park (definite accusative parkı, plural parklar)

  1. park

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative park
Definite accusative parkı
Singular Plural
Nominative park parklar
Definite accusative parkı parkları
Dative parka parklara
Locative parkta parklarda
Ablative parktan parklardan
Genitive parkın parkların

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English park.

NounEdit

park

  1. a park, inclosure

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN