See also: Puer, pür, Pu'er, Pǔ'ěr, and pǔ'ěr

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Perhaps from French puer.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

puer (uncountable)

  1. (chiefly historical) Dung (of dogs, fowls, etc) used in tanning, after applying lime, to soften skins.
    • 1842, The Penny Magazine, May 212/1:
      A solution called the ‘pure’ or the 'pewer' (having never seen the word written.., we must spell it as pronounced) is prepared in a large vessel, and into this the skins are immersed.
    • 1903, Henry Richardson Proctor, The principles of leather manufacture, page 174:
      [] The bacteria of fresh dog-dung were not found to possess a satisfactory puering effect, but those from dung with had been fermented a month (as in practice) have a result nearly equal to actual puer.
    • 2009, Tony Covington, Tanning Chemistry: The Science of Leather, page 166:
      [] it was about 50 years before the use of puer was discontinued, at least in Europe.

Etymology 2 edit

From the Hanyu Pinyin romanization of 普洱 (pǔ'ěr), without syllable-dividing mark (隔音符號隔音符号 (géyīn fúhào)).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

puer

  1. Alternative form of pu'er
Usage notes edit

Puer can be considered a misspelling of pu'er. In theory, a syllable-dividing mark (隔音符號隔音符号 (géyīn fúhào)) should be added before a non-initial syllable beginning with a, o, or e. Hence, puer is not allowed since a word made up of pu and er would be spelled as pu'er (cf. pu'er). In practice, syllable-dividing marks are often added or omitted at will.

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

puer (plural puers)

  1. Ellipsis of puer aeternus.
    • 1957, IW: The Management Magazine, volume 140, page 6:
      “No; you called it that. Anyway, what’s wrong with ‘whither’?” / “Oh, that; we had to struggle through a high school commencement speech one time, something about ‘Whither now, oh, puers and puellas?’ and now the word gives us the hiccoughs.”
    • 1979, Quadrant, volume 12 or 13, page 102:
      As I mentioned earlier, the circumstances that precipitate puer development prece sexual differentiation and the formation of a strong identity based on gender. Some puers and puellas are, therefore, heterosexual, others are homosexual.
    • 1996, Seymour Boorstein, editor, Transpersonal Psychotherapy, 2nd edition, State University of New York Press, →ISBN, pages 472, 473:
      TR spirit-work: For some extreme and gifted puers and puellas, Jesus or Mary another spirit comes in vivid visions. [] The blessing, though related to the body, takes place mainly on a heavenly-spiritual place. It is a necessary beginning for puers and puellas, though much embodied “shadow-material” remains to be dealt with, including the “nasty old (wo)man.”
    • 1996 June 8, Daryl Sharp, “Re: Puer Aeternus info.”, in alt.psychology.jung (Usenet), message-ID <31B98038.779E@inforamp.net>:
      Mr. Pan, I wrote a book that owes much to von Franz's interpretation of the puer syndrome: THE SECRET RAVEN: Conflict and Transformation in the Life of Franz Kafka (Inner City Books, 1980). Also, my book THE SURVIVAL PAPERS: Anatomy of a Midlife Crisis (Inner City, 1988) is a narrative about the personal analysis of a puer brought to his knees by his own psychology.
    • 1999 February 21, Sharyn C, “Re: Hillman Online”, in alt.psychology.jung (Usenet), message-ID <3B348FE4.1963DB1D@prodigy.net>:
      Having a child was a definite turning point in my puella lifestyle, so was getting an education and working towards a serious career. John Lee's book is on my shelf and will have to give it another look in the coming days. I much prefer Hillman's twist on the puer archetype over some of the Jungians. Even my fav, Von-Franz, is a bit too pessimistic about it. Hillman's archetypal dig brings back the positive aspects of the puer/puella and for those of us who inhabit this realm,it was a great relief to be able to claim more than the negative side of it.
    • 2000 June 3, Troubledoor, “Re: Question about Puer and Thanatos”, in alt.psychology.jung (Usenet), message-ID <393843A8.737705E6@earthlink.net>:
      Nobody understands the puer aeternus and also the puella aetermiss because they are the archetypicals of eternity in time. [] The puer and puella are more like masks/roles in this respect because no one ever measures up to these standards. So most people only know the pue's by the shadow or shallow. [] And the puers and puellas don't remember anymore the ego's DIGNITY AND HONOR because they are worn out.
    • 2005, Erin Sullivan, Astrology of Midlife and Aging, →ISBN:
      The combination of Scorpio and Capricorn is not a terribly cheerful image, and considering the mundane events of the time in which this transit occurred, we would be fools to consider that the product of those times might be a lighthearted, happy-go-lucky bunch of puers and puellas. [] Puers and puellas have a very hard time individuating into their aging process.
    • 2005, Daryl Sharp, Not the Big Sleep: On Having Fun, Seriously: A Jungian Romance, Inner City Books, →ISBN, page 48:
      You see, puers and puellas are always about to make a change; one day they’ll do what’s necessary—but not just yet.
    • 2007, Robert A. Johnson, Jerry Ruhl, Living Your Unlived Life: Coping with Unrealized Dreams and Fulfilling Your Purpose in the Second Half of Life, →ISBN:
      We are also familiar with the type of man or woman who is overly dominated by the Eternal Youth. Though more common in the first half of life, there are Puers and Puellas of all ages, and their energy is often a delight during courting. [] These Puers and Puellas can never commit, fearing that choices may limit their options.
Coordinate terms edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French puir (with a change in conjugation), from Vulgar Latin *putīre, from Classical Latin pūtēre (also with a change in conjugation), present active infinitive of pūteō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *puH-.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

puer

  1. (intransitive) to stink, to smell (bad)
    Synonym: poquer
  2. (transitive) to stink of
    Cet homme pue l’ail.That man stinks of garlic.

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Hunsrik edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German pūr, from Latin purus.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

puer

  1. pure

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *puweros, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂weros, from *peh₂w-. Cognate with Oscan 𐌐𐌖𐌂𐌋𐌖𐌌 (puglum), Ancient Greek παῖς (paîs, boy).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

puer m (genitive puerī, feminine puera); second declension

  1. a child; chit
  2. a boy, lad (typically between ages 7-14 but could be younger) (older than an infans but younger than an adulescens)
  3. a male servant or page; slave
  4. a bachelor
  5. boyhood (ex: in puero, "in his boyhood" or "as a boy")

Declension edit

Second-declension noun (nominative singular in -er).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative puer puerī
Genitive puerī puerōrum
Dative puerō puerīs
Accusative puerum puerōs
Ablative puerō puerīs
Vocative puer puerī

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

See also edit

References edit

  • puer”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • puer”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • puer in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • from youth up: a puero (is), a parvo (is), a parvulo (is)
    • a boy ten years old: puer decem annorum
    • to entrust a child to the tuition of..: puerum alicui erudiendum or in disciplinam tradere
    • to teach children the rudiments: pueros elementa (prima) docere
    • (ambiguous) to leave one's boyhood behind one, become a man: ex pueris excedere
  • puer in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016


Anagrams edit

Luxembourgish edit

Etymology edit

From the noun Puer.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

puer

  1. few, some, a few
    • 2001, Pol Wilmes, Eng Klack fir eis Sprooch[3]:
      All puer Woche fannt dir eist „Chamber-Blietchen“ an ärer Bréifkëscht, vläicht och op der Trap oder am Gank;
      Every few weeks we find our "Chamber-Blietchen" in our letter box, perhaps even on the stairs or in the hallway;