Open main menu

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cloāca (sewer), from cluō (cleanse; purge).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cloaca (plural cloacas or cloacae)

  1. (sometimes figuratively) A sewer.
    • 1773, Gentleman's Magazine, No. 43, p. 598:
      The Thames, polluted with the filthy effusions of the cloacae.
    • 1850, Thomas Carlyle, Latter-day Pamphlets, Ch. iv, p. 46:
    • [] that tremendous cloaca of Pauperism []
  2. (zoology) The duct in reptiles, amphibians and birds, as well as most fish and some mammals, which serves as the common outlet for urination, defecation, and reproduction.
    • 1822, John Mason Good, The Study of Medicine, Vol. I, p. 7:
      In birds the rectum, at the termination of its canal, forms an oval or elongated pouch [] and then expands into a cavity, which has been named cloaca.
  3. An outhouse or lavatory.
    • 1840, Frederick Marryat, Olla Podrida, Ch. xxiv:
      To every house [] a cloaca.
  4. (anatomy) A duct through which gangrenous material escapes a body.
    • 1846, Frederick Brittan translating Joseph François Malgaigne as Manual of Operative Surgery, p. 172
      Across this shell [sc. of bone] small holes are eaten, by which the matter escapes, and which are called cloacae (Weidmann).

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary. "cloaca, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1891.

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cloaca.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌkloːˈaː.kaː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: clo‧a‧ca

NounEdit

cloaca f (plural cloaca's)

  1. (zoology) cloaca (duct in certain vertebrates used for reproduction and excreting digestive waste)

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cloaca. Cognate to the inherited doublet chiavica.

NounEdit

cloaca f (plural cloache)

  1. sewer
  2. cesspit, cesspool
  3. (anatomy) cloaca

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From cluō (cleanse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cloāca f (genitive cloācae); first declension

  1. A sewer or underground drain
  2. (humorous) The stomach of a drunken or voracious woman

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cloāca cloācae
Genitive cloācae cloācārum
Dative cloācae cloācīs
Accusative cloācam cloācās
Ablative cloācā cloācīs
Vocative cloāca cloācae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cloaca in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cloaca in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cloaca in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • cloaca in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cloaca in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cloaca.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cloaca f (plural cloacas)

  1. (anatomy) cloaca (excretory and genital duct in bird, reptiles and fish)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cloāca (sewer), from cluō (cleanse).

NounEdit

cloaca f (plural cloacas)

  1. sewer, storm drain
  2. (zoology) cloaca