See also: Colon, cólon, colón, còlon, côlon, and Colón

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Pronunciation

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  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkəʊ.lən/, /ˈkəʊ.lɒn/
  • (US) enPR: kō'lən, IPA(key): /ˈkoʊ.lən/, /ˈkɔ.lən/, [ˈkʰɔ.ɫn̩]
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊlən

Etymology 1

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From Latin cōlon (a member of a verse of poem), from Ancient Greek κῶλον (kôlon, a member, limb, clause, part of a verse).

Noun

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colon (plural colons or cola)

  1. The punctuation mark :.
    • 2005, William Strunk Jr., E.B. White, The Elements of Style, Penguin Press, page 15:
      A colon tells the reader that what follows is closely related to the preceding clause.
  2. (rare) The triangular colon (especially in context of not being able to type the actual triangular colon).
  3. (rhetoric) A rhetorical figure consisting of a clause which is grammatically, but not logically, complete.
  4. (palaeography) A clause or group of clauses written as a line, or taken as a standard of measure in ancient manuscripts or texts.
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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See also
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Punctuation

Etymology 2

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From Latin cŏlon (large intestine), from Ancient Greek κόλον (kólon, the large intestine, also food, meat, fodder).

Noun

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colon (plural colons or cola or coli)

  1. (anatomy) Part of the large intestine; the final segment of the digestive system, after (distal to) the ileum and before (proximal to) the rectum. (Because the colon is the largest part of the large intestine (constituting most of it), it is often treated as synonymous therewith in broad or casual usage.)
Holonyms
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Meronyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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See also
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Etymology 3

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From French colon.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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colon (plural colons)

  1. (obsolete) A husbandman.
  2. A European colonial settler, especially in a French colony.
    • 1977, Alistair Horne, A Savage War of Peace, New York: Review Books, published 2006, page 28:
      The reaction of the European colons, a mixture of shock and fear, was to demand further draconian measures and to suspend any suggestion of new reforms.
Alternative forms
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Further reading

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  1. ^ colon”, in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: Merriam-Webster, 1996–present.
  2. ^ colon”, in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Anagrams

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Asturian

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Noun

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colon m (plural cólones)

  1. (anatomy) colon (digestive system)

Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Latin colōnus.

Noun

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colon m (plural colons, feminine colona)

  1. colonist, settler
  2. farmer during the Roman Empire
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Spanish colón.

Noun

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colon m (plural colons)

  1. (numismatics) colon (currency unit of Costa Rica, and formerly of El Salvador)

Further reading

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Esperanto

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Noun

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colon

  1. accusative singular of colo

French

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Etymology 1

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Learned borrowing from Latin colōnus.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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colon m (plural colons)

  1. colonist, colonizer
  2. settler (in a French colony)
    • Laurent Lamoine, Le Pouvoir locale en Gaule romaine, 2009, 240.
      Sous les auspices du dictateur A. Cornelius Cossus, les Romains viennent de remporter une victoire sur leurs voisins Volsques, Latins et Herniques, associés aux colons romains en rébellion de Circéi et Vélitrae.
  3. camper (child in a colonie de vacances)
    • José Casatéjada, Via Compostela: Des Monts du Velay à la Costa da Morte, 2015, 243.
      Une fois encore, ils me ramènant à mon enfance, aux colonies de vacances. Aves les autres petits colons, mes frères et moi trottions sur les chemins de traverse pour aller jouer dans les près ou à la rivière.
  4. sharecropper in the system of colonat partiaire
  5. (vulgar, Canada) hillbilly, hick
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Etymology 2

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See côlon.

Noun

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colon

  1. Misspelling of côlon.

Further reading

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Etymology 3

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Abbreviation of colonel.[1]

Pronunciation

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  1. (military slang) colonel

Derived terms

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Interlingua

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Noun

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colon (uncountable)

  1. (anatomy) colon

Italian

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Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology 1

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Unadapted borrowing from Latin colon, from Ancient Greek κόλον (kólon).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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colon m (invariable)

  1. (anatomy) colon (part of the body)
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Unadapted borrowing from Latin cōlon, from Ancient Greek κῶλον (kôlon).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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colon m (plural cola)

  1. colon (punctuation mark)

Etymology 3

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Unadapted borrowing from Spanish colón.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /koˈlɔn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔn
  • Hyphenation: co‧lòn

Noun

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colon m (plural colones)

  1. Alternative form of colón

Anagrams

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Latin

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Etymology 1

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From Ancient Greek κόλον (kólon).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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colon n (genitive colī); second declension

  1. (anatomy) The colon; large intestine
  2. colic, a disease of the colon
Declension
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Second-declension noun (neuter, Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative colon cola
Genitive colī colōrum
Dative colō colīs
Accusative colon cola
Ablative colō colīs
Vocative colon cola
Descendants
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Etymology 2

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From Ancient Greek κῶλον (kôlon).

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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cōlon n (genitive cōlī); second declension

  1. a member or part of a verse of a poem
Declension
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Second-declension noun (neuter, Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cōlon cōla
Genitive cōlī cōlōrum
Dative cōlō cōlīs
Accusative cōlon cōla
Ablative cōlō cōlīs
Vocative cōlon cōla
Synonyms
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Descendants
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References

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  • colon”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • colon in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • colon”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French côlon.

Noun

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colon m (plural coloni)

  1. colon

Declension

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Spanish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Latin cōlon, from Ancient Greek κῶλον (kôlon).

Noun

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colon m (plural cólones)

  1. (grammar) colon (punctuation mark)

Etymology 2

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From Latin cŏlon, from Ancient Greek κόλον (kólon).

Noun

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colon m (plural cólones)

  1. (anatomy) colon (part of the large intestine)
Derived terms
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Further reading

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