satiate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin satiatus, past participle of satiare (to fill full, satiate), from sat + satis (sufficient) + satur (full).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈseɪʃɪeɪt/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

satiate (third-person singular simple present satiates, present participle satiating, simple past and past participle satiated)

  1. (transitive) To fill to satisfaction; to satisfy.
    Nothing seemed to satiate her desire for knowledge.
  2. (transitive) To satisfy to excess. To fill to satiety.

Usage notesEdit

Used interchangeably with, and more common than, sate.[1]

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

satiate (comparative more satiate, superlative most satiate)

  1. Filled to satisfaction or to excess.
    • 1733-1738, Alexander Pope, Imitations of Horace:
      Our generals now, retir'd to their estates,
      Hang their old trophies o'er the garden gates;
      In life's cool evening satiate of applause

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Monthly Gleanings: November 2011: Sate versus satiated.”, OUPblog

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

satiāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of satiō

ParticipleEdit

satiāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of satiātus

ReferencesEdit