German

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle High German schicken (to outfit oneself, fit in, arrange appropriately), from Old High German *skihhen, from Proto-West Germanic *skikkijan, from Proto-Germanic *skikkijaną (to order, send). This represents the causative of Middle High German geschehen, geschēn (to happen, rush).

Akin to Middle English skekken (to send forth), Old English sċēon (to happen), Dutch schie- in schielijk (hasty). Related to English chic.

Verb

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schicken (weak, third-person singular present schickt, past tense schickte, past participle geschickt, auxiliary haben)

  1. (transitive, ditransitive) to send, to dispatch (a person, letter, money etc. to a destination or a person)
    Synonyms: senden, versenden, verschicken
    Antonyms: empfangen, erhalten, bekommen
    Sie hat mir einen Liebesbrief geschickt.
    She sent me a love letter.
  2. (reflexive) to hurry (rare)
  3. (reflexive) to be decent, to be appropriate
    Synonym: sich benehmen
Conjugation
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Verb

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schicken (weak, third-person singular present schickt, past tense schickte, past participle geschickt, auxiliary haben)

  1. to chew tobacco
    Synonym: priemen
Conjugation
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Further reading

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Middle Dutch

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Etymology

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From Old Dutch *skikken, from Proto-West Germanic *skikkijan, from Proto-Germanic *skikkijaną (to make move). See German schicken (to send) above.[1]

Verb

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schicken

  1. to arrange, to carry out, to get done
  2. to create, to bring to life
  3. to direct
  4. to determine, to assign
  5. (late) to send, to delegate

Inflection

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This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

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  • Dutch: schikken
  • Limburgish: sjikke

References

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  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013) “skekkjan”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 442

Further reading

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