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AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

sorrir (first-person singular indicative present sorro, past participle sorríu)

  1. Alternative form of sonrir

ConjugationEdit


GalicianEdit

 
sorrir: Daniel smiles. 12th-century, cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.

EtymologyEdit

Inherited, from Old Portuguese sorriir, documented in Medieval Galician proper, in the Cronica Geral and Cronica Troyana, from Latin subrīdēre, present active infinitive of subrīdeō (I smile).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sorrir (first-person singular present sorrío, first-person singular preterite sorrín, past participle sorrido)

  1. to smile
    • 1370, Ramón Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 548:
      Quando as donas et as donzelas esto oýrõ, ouuerõ grã uergonça, et começarõ de sorrijr, et nõ rresponderõ nada
      When the ladies and the maiden heard that, they felt embarrassed and smiled, but they didn't replied anything

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • sorriir” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • sorrir” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • sorrir” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • sorrir” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese sorriir, from Latin subrīdēre, present active infinitive of subrīdeō (smile).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sorrir (first-person singular present indicative sorrio, past participle sorrido)

  1. to smile

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit