Last modified on 5 December 2014, at 18:07

sorta

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Written form of a reduction of sort + of

AdverbEdit

sorta (not comparable)

  1. (informal) Sort of; somewhat; not quite.
    The portraits on the wall aren't so useful, just sorta cool to have around
    • 1912, Caspar Whitney, Albert Britt, Outing: Sport, Adventure, Travel, Fiction, Volume 60, page 680,
      'Webb,' he says sorta sorrowful like, 'it looks like a howlin' shame to have a bang-up American girl hooked up to a money-grubbin' member of the British nobility. [] '
    • 1993 July, Sort of a Hero, in Boys' Life, page 34,
      In fact the whole thing sorta backfired on old Chuck — and on me and Pete too. Instead of laughing about it, most people thought it was pretty crummy.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ContractionEdit

sorta (plural sortsa)

  1. (colloquial) sort of.
    There's gotta be some sorta explanation.
    • 2001, Lawrence A. Wenzel, The Sandcastle at High Tide, page 97,
      He glanced at her then back at me. "What sorta research?"
      "Well, war correspondent might not be too far off," I said.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

sorta f (plural sorte)

  1. sort, type, kind

VerbEdit

sorta

  1. Feminine singular past participle of sorgere.

AnagramsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

sȏrta f (Cyrillic spelling со̑рта)

  1. sort, kind

DeclensionEdit