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EnglishEdit

 
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A stadium (venue for sporting events)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin stadium (a measure of length, a race course) (commonly one-eighth of a Roman mile; translated in early English Bibles by furlong), from Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion, a measure of length, a running track), especially the track at Olympia, which was one stadium in length. The Greek word may literally mean "fixed standard of length" (from στάδιος (stádios, firm, fixed), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-, whence also stand).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsteɪ.di.əm/
  • Hyphenation: sta‧di‧um
  • (file)

NounEdit

stadium (plural stadiums or stadia)

  1. A venue where sporting events are held.
    • 2013 June 18, Simon Romero, New York TimesProtests Widen as Brazilians Chide Leaders:
      In a convulsion that has caught many in Brazil and beyond by surprise, waves of protesters denounced their leaders for dedicating so many resources to cultivating Brazil’s global image by building stadiums for international events, when basic services like education and health care remain woefully inadequate.
  2. An Ancient Greek racecourse, especially, the Olympic course for foot races.
  3. (now historical) A Greek measure of length, being the chief one used for itinerary distances, also adopted by the Romans for nautical and astronomical measurements, equal to 600 Greek or 625 Roman feet, or 125 Roman paces, or to 606 feet, 9 inches.
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970:
      , II.ii.3:
      Dionysiodorus [] sent a letter ad superos after he was dead, from the centre of the earth, to signify what distance the same centre was from the superficies of the same, viz. 42,000 stadiums […].
  4. A kind of telemeter for measuring the distance of an object of known dimensions, by observing the angle it subtends.
  5. (surveying) a graduated rod used to measure the distance of the place where it stands from an instrument having a telescope, by observing the number of the graduations of the rod that are seen between certain parallel wires (stadia wires) in the field of view of the telescope.
  6. (biology) A life stage of an organism.

Usage notesEdit

  • The alternative plural stadia is occasionally used, chiefly in high-register contexts.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


CzechEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

stadium n

  1. stage, phase

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Latin stadium (a measure of length, a race course) (commonly one-eighth of a Roman mile; translated in early English Bibles by furlong), from Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion, a measure of length, a running track), especially the track at Olympia, which was one stadium in length. The Greek word may literally mean "fixed standard of length" (from στάδιος (stádios, firm, fixed), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-, whence also stand).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sta‧di‧um

NounEdit

stadium n (plural stadiums or stadia, diminutive stadiumpje n)

  1. A stadium.
  2. A stage; a phase.

Usage notesEdit

  • Stadium is a learned term used in certain proper nouns such as Yankee Stadium. The standard Dutch term is stadion.

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stadium n (genitive stadiī or stadī); second declension

  1. stade (distance of 125 paces)
  2. racecourse (athletics)

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative stadium stadia
Genitive stadiī
stadī1
stadiōrum
Dative stadiō stadiīs
Accusative stadium stadia
Ablative stadiō stadiīs
Vocative stadium stadia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

SynonymsEdit

  • (measure of distance): stadiī (plurale tantum)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • stadium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • stadium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • stadium in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to run a foot-race: stadium currere (Off. 3. 10. 42)
  • stadium in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • stadium in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • stadium in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English stadium, from Latin stadium, from Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion), from στάδιος (stádios), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stadium

  1. stadium (venue where sporting events are held)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion), via Latin stadium

NounEdit

stadium n (definite singular stadiet, indefinite plural stadier, definite plural stadia or stadiene)

  1. a stage (of a process or development)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion), via Latin stadium

NounEdit

stadium n (definite singular stadiet, indefinite plural stadium, definite plural stadia)

  1. a stage (of a process or development)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stadium n (plural stadia)

  1. stage, phase

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit