See also: Camp, CAMP, cAMP, câmp, cãmp, and cämp-

English edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English kampe (battlefield, open space), from Old English camp (battle, contest, battlefield, open space), from Proto-West Germanic *kamp (open field where military exercises are held, level plain), from Latin campus (open field, level plain), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂emp- (to bend; crooked). Reinforced circa 1520 by Middle French can, camp (place where an army lodges temporarily), from Old Northern French camp, from the same Latin (whence also French champ from Old French). Cognate with Old High German champf (battle, struggle) (German Kampf), Old Norse kapp (battle), Old High German hamf (paralysed, maimed, mutilated). Doublet of campus and champ.

The verb is from Middle English campen, from Old English campian, compian (to fight, war against), from Proto-West Germanic *kampōn (to fight, do battle), from *kamp (field, battlefield, battle), see above. Cognate with Dutch kampen, German kämpfen (to struggle), Danish kæmpe, Swedish kämpa.

Noun edit

camp (countable and uncountable, plural camps)

  1. An outdoor place acting as temporary accommodation in tents or other temporary structures.
  2. An organised event, often taking place in tents or temporary accommodation.
  3. A base of a military group, not necessarily temporary.
  4. A concentration camp; gulag.
    • 2013 June 18, Esther Felden, “Hell on earth”, in Deutsche Welle[1], archived from the original on 22 June 2015[2]:
      Mr. Ahn Myong-Chol was a prison guard at Camp 22 in Hoeryong and a driver at the camps. He was there between 1990 and 1994. He is the one who reported that prisoners had been used for human experimentation inside the camps.
  5. A single hut or shelter.
    a hunter's camp
  6. The company or body of persons encamped.
  7. A group of people with the same strong ideals or political leanings.
  8. (obsolete) An army.
  9. (uncommon) Campus
  10. (informal) A summer camp.
  11. (prison slang) A prison.
    • 2009, Nick Chandler, Jeanette Billings, Determined to Change: The Autobiography of Nick Chandler, page 184:
      Lantana is a sweet camp. It's an old hospital that has been converted to a drug treatment center for prisoners.
  12. (agriculture) A mound of earth in which potatoes and other vegetables are stored for protection against frost
    Synonyms: burrow, pie
  13. (obsolete) Conflict; battle.
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • German: Camp
  • Irish: campa
  • Japanese: キャンプ (kyanpu)
  • Korean: 캠프 (kaempeu)
  • Malay: kem
  • Ottoman Turkish: ⁧قامپ
  • Scottish Gaelic: campa
  • Scottish Gaelic: campadh
  • Spanish: campo (semantic loan) (New Mexico)
  • Swahili: kambi
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

camp (third-person singular simple present camps, present participle camping, simple past and past participle camped)

  1. To live in a tent or similar temporary accommodation.
    We're planning to camp in the field until Sunday.
  2. To set up a camp.
  3. (transitive) To afford rest or lodging for.
  4. (intransitive, sports, video games) To stay in an advantageous location.
    Some players like to camp next to a power-up's spawning point.
    • 1962, Coach & Athlete, page 18:
      Yet, even without the three second rule, where your big man could camp underneath and take those delightful “garbage” shots, there was little or no pivot offense, no cutting off the bucket.
  5. (transitive, video games) To stay beside (something) to gain an advantage.
    The easiest way to win on this map is to camp the double damage.
    Go and camp the flag for the win.
  6. (transitive, video games) Short for corpse camp.
  7. (intransitive, obsolete) To fight; contend in battle or in any kind of contest; to strive with others in doing anything; compete.
    • 1562, Leigh, The Accedens of Armory ː
      Aristotle affirmeth that Rauens will gather together on sides, and campe and fight for victorie.
  8. (intransitive, obsolete) To wrangle; argue.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2 edit

Unknown. Suggested origins include the 17th century French word camper (to put oneself in a pose),[1] an assumed dialectal English word *camp or *kemp (rough, uncouth) and a derivation from camp (n.)[2] Believed to be from Polari, otherwise obscure.[3]

 
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Noun edit

camp (uncountable)

  1. An affected, exaggerated or intentionally tasteless style.
    • 1985 September 2, Joe Klein, quoting Douglas S. Cramer, “The Real Star of ‘Dynasty’”, in New York, page 34:
      We walk a fine line, just this side of camp. Careful calculations are made. We sense that while it might be wonderful for Krystle and Alexis to have a catfight in a koi pond, it would be inappropriate for Joan to smack Linda with a koi.
    • 1996 March 31, Trip Gabriel, “Showgirls' Crawls Back As High Camp at Midnight”, in The New York Times[3], →ISSN:
      Why would any Hollywood studio encourage a film's transformation into camp, in effect joining in the mockery of its own product? MGM declined to comment.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Adjective edit

camp (comparative camper, superlative campest)

  1. Theatrical; making exaggerated gestures.
  2. (of a man) Ostentatiously effeminate.[4]
    • 2007, David Rothwell, Dictionary of Homonyms, Wordsworth Editions, →ISBN, page 88:
      More recently the word has become colloquial English for either implying that someone is a homosexual (‘he's very camp’), or for describing rather outre behaviour []
    • 2014, Sarah Lotz, The Three, Hachette UK, →ISBN:
      And to be honest, in the illustration Mr Tumnus does look as camp as fuck with his little scarf tied jauntily around his neck. I suppose it isn't outside the realms of possibility that he'd just been off cottaging with some centaurs in the forest. God.
  3. Intentionally tasteless or vulgar, self-parodying.
    • 2002, Georges-Claude Guilbert, Madonna as Postmodern Myth, McFarland, →ISBN, page 123:
      In Saturday Night Live, Madonna also unsurprisingly played Princess Diana, Marilyn Monroe, and a Joan Collins clone, all in a very camp way. As John Dean writes: “U.S. rock has a ruling camp queen with Madonna.”
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

camp (third-person singular simple present camps, present participle camping, simple past and past participle camped)

  1. To behave in a camp manner; camp it up.
    • 1988 April 9, Gordon Gottlieb, “The Urban Gay Camp and Croon”, in Gay Community News, page 11:
      Oster and his his two co-stars, Jamie MacKenzie and Bill Martel, boogie and bop, sway and swish, camp and croon through tightly worked production numbers addressing a range of serious (and not so serious) issues that middle class, urban gay men come up against.

Descendants edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Spanish campo (countryside).

Noun edit

camp (countable and uncountable, plural camps)

  1. (slang, Falkland Islands) The areas of the Falkland Islands situated outside the capital and largest settlement, Stanley.
  2. An electoral constituency of the legislative assembly of the Falkland Islands that composes of all territory more than 3.5 miles from the spire of the Christ Church Cathedral in Stanley.

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024), “camp”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  2. ^ Michael Quinion, "Camp" in: World Wide Words, 2003
  3. ^ listed in the Oxford English Dictionary, second edition (1989)
  4. ^ Reuben, David R. (1969), chapter 8, in Everything you always wanted to know about sex but were too afraid to ask, New York: David McKay Company, Inc., published 1970, →LCCN, Homosexuals have their own language?, page 146: “CAMP: be obviously and obnoxiously homosexual”

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin campus (compare Occitan camp, French champ, Spanish campo), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂emp- (to bend, curve).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

camp m (plural camps)

  1. field (open area of land)
    Synonym: terreny
  2. camp (temporary outdoor accommodation)
    Synonym: campament
  3. field of study, discipline
    Synonym: disciplina
  4. (physics) field

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  • “camp” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Chinese edit

Etymology 1 edit

From English camp.

Pronunciation edit


Noun edit

camp

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) camp (organised event); summer camp

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From English camp.

Pronunciation edit


Adjective edit

camp

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) camp (effeminate)
Synonyms edit

References edit

  • Bauer, Robert S. (2021) ABC Cantonese-English Comprehensive Dictionary, Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, →ISBN, page 538

French edit

 
camp militaire pendant la guerre de 1914-18.

Etymology 1 edit

Probably from a Norman or Picard word equivalent to French champ (itself inherited from Old French champ and Latin), from Old Northern French camp, from Latin campus, or alternatively from Occitan camp, Old Occitan camp, possibly Italian campo. Doublet of campus and champ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

camp m (plural camps)

  1. camp (An outdoor place acting as temporary accommodation in tents or other temporary structures.)
    Il a dressé son camp de l'autre côté de la rivière. ― He has erected his camp on the other side of the river.
  2. camp (Semi-temporary accommodation)
    Un camp de concentration. ― A concentration camp.
  3. camp (A base of a military group, not necessarily temporary)
    Les camps ennemis. ― The enemy camps.
  4. camp (A group of people with the same ideals or political leanings, strongly supported.)
    Ce pays est partagé en deux camps. ― This country is divided into two camps.
  5. camp, summer camp
    Un camp de vacances. ― A summer camp. (idiomatic; French usage does not specify a season)
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

 
très camp!

Borrowed from English camp.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

camp (invariable)

  1. camp (Intentionally tasteless or vulgar, self-parodying, affected, exaggerated)
    Une folle camp ne peut jamais en faire trop.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Noun edit

camp m (uncountable)

  1. campness; An affected, exaggerated or intentionally tasteless style
    La tactique des Sœurs dans la lutte contre le sida repose sur une stratégie politique : une utilisation du camp, une réappropriation revendiquée de l’efféminement, de la visibilité homosexuelle et de la follitude qui visent à désarmer les injonctions morales pesant sur la sexualité – sociales, religieuses, liées au sexe, au genre, aux pratiques sexuelles…
Synonyms edit

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English campian.

Verb edit

camp

  1. Alternative form of campen

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse kampr.

Adjective edit

camp

  1. Alternative form of kempe (shaggy)

Norman edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Northern French camp (compare Old French champ), from Latin campus, from Proto-Indo-European *kamp- (to bend; crooked). Compare French champ.

Noun edit

camp m (plural camps)

  1. (Guernsey) field

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *kamp, from Latin campus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

camp m

  1. combat

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

camp n

  1. an enclosed piece of land

Descendants edit

Old French edit

 
Le camp du drap d'or.

Noun edit

camp oblique singularm (oblique plural cans, nominative singular cans, nominative plural camp)

  1. Alternative form of champ (field)

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Welsh camp, from Proto-Brythonic *kamp, from Latin campus, from the senses of "field of action, scope, opportunity, or produce of a field". Doublet of Caint (Kent) and siampên (champagne).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

camp f (plural campau)

  1. feat, accomplishment
    Synonym: gorchest
  2. sport, contest

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
camp gamp nghamp champ
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.