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See also: Camp, CAMP, cAMP, and câmp

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English kampe (battlefield, open space), from Old English camp (battle, contest, battlefield, open space), from Proto-Germanic *kampaz, *kampą (open field where military exercises are held, level plain), from Latin campus (open field, level plain), from Proto-Indo-European *kamp- (to bend; crooked). Reinforced circa 1520 by Middle French can, camp (place where an army lodges temporarily), from Old Northern French camp, from the same Latin (whence also French champ from Old French). Cognate with Old High German champf (battle, struggle) (German Kampf), Old Norse kapp (battle), Old High German hamf (paralysed, maimed, mutilated).

The verb is from Middle English campen, from Old English campian, compian (to fight, war against), from Proto-Germanic *kampōną (to fight, do battle), from *kampaz (field, battlefield, battle), see above. Cognate with Dutch kampen, German kämpfen (to struggle), Danish kæmpe, Swedish kämpa.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kæmp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æmp

NounEdit

camp (plural camps)

  1. (archaic) Conflict; battle.
  2. An outdoor place acting as temporary accommodation in tents or other temporary structures.
  3. An organised event, often taking place in tents or temporary accommodation.
  4. A base of a military group, not necessarily temporary.
  5. A single hut or shelter.
    a hunter's camp
  6. The company or body of persons encamped.
    • Macaulay
      The camp broke up with the confusion of a flight.
  7. A group of people with the same strong ideals or political leanings.
  8. (uncommon) Campus
  9. (informal) A summer camp.
  10. (agriculture) A mound of earth in which potatoes and other vegetables are stored for protection against frost; called also burrow and pie.
  11. (Britain, obsolete) An ancient game of football, played in some parts of England.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

camp (third-person singular simple present camps, present participle camping, simple past and past participle camped)

  1. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To fight; contend in battle or in any kind of contest; to strive with others in doing anything; compete.
  2. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To wrangle; argue.
  3. To live in a tent or similar temporary accommodation.
    We're planning to camp in the field until Sunday.
  4. To set up a camp.
  5. (transitive) To afford rest or lodging for.
    • Shakespeare
      Had our great palace the capacity / To camp this host, we all would sup together.
  6. (video games) To stay in an advantageous location in a video game, such as next to a power-up's spawning point or in order to guard an area.
    The easiest way to win on this map is to camp the double damage.
    Go and camp the flag for the win.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown. Suggested origins include the 17th century French word camper (to put oneself in a pose),[1] an assumed dialectal English word *camp or *kemp (rough, uncouth) and a derivation from camp (n.)[2] Believed to be from Polari, otherwise obscure.[3]

 
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NounEdit

camp (uncountable)

  1. An affected, exaggerated or intentionally tasteless style.
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

camp (comparative camper, superlative campest)

  1. Theatrical; making exaggerated gestures.
  2. (of a man) Ostentatiously effeminate.
    • 2014, Sarah Lotz, The Three, Hachette UK →ISBN
      And to be honest, in the illustration Mr Tumnus does look as camp as fuck with his little scarf tied jauntily around his neck. I suppose it isn't outside the realms of possibility that he'd just been off cottaging with some centaurs in the forest. God.
    • 2007, David Rothwell, Dictionary of Homonyms, Wordsworth Editions →ISBN, page 88
      More recently the word has become colloquial English for either implying that someone is a homosexual ('he's very camp'), or for describing rather outre behaviour...
  3. Intentionally tasteless or vulgar, self-parodying.
    • 2002, Georges-Claude Guilbert, Madonna as Postmodern Myth: How One Star's Self-Construction Rewrites Sex, Gender, Hollywood and the American Dream, McFarland →ISBN, page 123
      In Saturday Night Live, Madonna also unsurprisingly played Princess Diana, Marilyn Monroe, and a Joan Collins clone, all in a very camp way. As John Dean writes: “U.S. rock has a ruling camp queen with Madonna.”...
TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper, "camp (adj.)" in: Etymonline.com - Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001ff
  2. ^ Micheal Quinion, "Camp" in: World Wide Words, 2003
  3. ^ listed in the Oxford English Dictionary, second edition (1989)

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan camp (compare Occitan camp), from Latin campus (compare French champ, Spanish campo), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂emp- (to bend, curve).

NounEdit

camp m (plural camps)

  1. field (open area of land)
  2. camp (temporary outdoor accommodation)
  3. field of study, discipline
  4. (physics) field

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
camp militaire pendant la guerre de 1914-18.

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from a Norman or Picard word equivalent to French champ (itself inherited from Old French champ and Latin), from Old Northern French camp, from Latin campus, or alternatively from Occitan camp, Old Occitan camp, possibly Italian campo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

camp m (plural camps)

  1. camp (An outdoor place acting as temporary accommodation in tents or other temporary structures.)
    Il a dressé son camp de l'autre côté de la rivière.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  2. camp (Semi-temporary accommodation)
    Un camp de concentration.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  3. camp (A base of a military group, not necessarily temporary)
    Les camps ennemis.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  4. camp (A group of people with the same ideals or political leanings, strongly supported.)
    Ce pays est partagé en deux camps.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  5. camp, summer camp.
    Un camp de vacances.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
très camp!

Borrowed from English camp.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

camp (invariable)

  1. camp (Intentionally tasteless or vulgar, self-parodying, affected, exaggerated)
    Une folle camp ne peut jamais en faire trop.

NounEdit

camp m (uncountable)

  1. campness; An affected, exaggerated or intentionally tasteless style.
    La tactique des Sœurs dans la lutte contre le sida repose sur une stratégie politique : une utilisation du camp, une réappropriation revendiquée de l’efféminement, de la visibilité homosexuelle et de la follitude qui visent à désarmer les injonctions morales pesant sur la sexualité – sociales, religieuses, liées au sexe, au genre, aux pratiques sexuelles…
SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English campian.

VerbEdit

camp

  1. Alternative form of campen

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse kampr.

AdjectiveEdit

camp

  1. Alternative form of kempe (shaggy)

NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Northern French camp (compare Old French champ), from Latin campus, from Proto-Indo-European *kamp- (to bend; crooked). Compare French champ.

NounEdit

camp m (plural camps)

  1. (Guernsey) field

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin campus.

NounEdit

camp ?

  1. combat

NounEdit

camp n

  1. an enclosed piece of land

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

 
Le camp du drap d'or.

EtymologyEdit

Found in Old Northern French, Picard and Norman dialects, etc. From Latin campus.

NounEdit

camp m (oblique plural cans, nominative singular cans, nominative plural camp)

  1. camp.
  2. Alternative form of champ

DescendantsEdit