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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French talisman, partly from Arabic طِلَسْم(ṭilasm), from Ancient Greek τέλεσμα (télesma, payment); and partly directly from Byzantine Greek τέλεσμα (télesma, talisman, religious rite, completion), from τελέω (teléō, to perform religious rites, to complete), from τέλος (télos, end, fulfillment, accomplishment, consummation, completion).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtæl.ɪsˌmæn/, /ˈtæl.ɪz.mən/
  • (file)
  • (file)

NounEdit

talisman (plural talismans)

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. A magical object providing protection against ill will, or the supernatural, or conferring the wearer with a boon such as good luck, good health, or power(s).
    • 1997, John Peel, chapter 10, in War of the Daleks, page 233:
      She kept low, clutching the rifle she'd taken as though it were a magic talisman, as if it would somehow protect her even though she didn't fire it.
    • 1956, Delano Ames, chapter 17, in Crime out of Mind[1]:
      Dagobert gave him back his passport. He re-pocketed it indifferently; a talisman which had lost its potency.
    • 1916, Frank Baum, chapter 1, in Rinkitink in Oz:
      I have in my possession three Magic Talismans, which I have ever guarded with utmost care, keeping the knowledge of their existence from anyone else.
    • 2018 January 1, Donald McRae, “The Guardian footballer of the year 2017: Juan Mata”, in the Guardian[2]:
      Mata would soon whip in the cross that allowed Drogba to equalise – and Chelsea went on to win the Champions League, beating the German club on penalties, with their talisman from the Ivory Coast making history with the final spot-kick.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

GalleryEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic طِلَسْم(ṭilasm), from Greek τέλεσμα (télesma).

NounEdit

talisman c (singular definite talismanen, plural indefinite talismaner)

  1. talisman

InflectionEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French talisman, from Arabic طِلَسْم‎(ṭilasm), from Ancient Greek τέλεσμα (télesma).

  • 1644, Johan de Brune, de Jonge, Wetsteen der vernuften, publ. by Iacob Lescaille, page 46.
    [] d'Arabiers geven 'er de naam van Talisman aan; gelijk Scaliger in zijn Fransche brieven getuigt.
    [] the Arabs give to it the name of Talisman; like Scaliger attests in his French letters.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtaː.lɪsˌmɑn/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ta‧lis‧man

NounEdit

talisman m (plural talismans or talismannen, diminutive talismannetje n)

  1. talisman, amulet [from 17th c.]

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

NounEdit

talisman m (plural talismans)

  1. talisman
    Synonym: amulette

HyponymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: talismà
  • English: talisman
  • Galician: talismán
  • Portuguese: talismã
  • Spanish: talismán

Further readingEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French talisman or Spanish talismán.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /talǐsmaːn/
  • Hyphenation: ta‧lis‧man

NounEdit

talìsmān m (Cyrillic spelling талѝсма̄н)

  1. talisman

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • talisman” in Hrvatski jezični portal