See also: tāss and TASS


Alternative formsEdit


Etymology 1Edit

Partly from Middle English tas ‎(heap), from Old French tas ‎(heap), from Old Frankish *tas ‎(mass, pile); and partly from Middle English taas ‎(heap, mow of corn), from Old English tas ‎(heap, mow of grain); both from Proto-Germanic *tasaz, *tassaz ‎(heap, mow, stack), from Proto-Indo-European *dāy- ‎(to divide, split, section, part, separate). Related to Middle Dutch tas, tasse ‎(Dutch tas, heap, pile), Middle Low German tas ‎(mow of hay or wheat), Gothic 𐌿𐌽𐌲𐌰𐍄𐌰𐍃𐍃 ‎(ungatass, disorganised, irregular); and possibly also to Old High German zetten ‎(to straw, fertilise), Old Norse tað ‎(spread dung). See tath.


tass ‎(plural tasses)

  1. (rare or obsolete) a heap, pile.

Etymology 2Edit

Compare French tasse ‎(cup, cupful).


tass ‎(plural tasses)

  1. A cup or cupful.
    • 1824, Sir Walter Scott, Redgauntlet
      "Here, Dougal," said the Laird, "gie Steenie a tass of brandy down stairs, till I count the siller and write the receipt."




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tass c

  1. a paw (animal's foot)
    (räcka) vacker tass
    give a paw
    Den sov på verandan med huvudet mot tassarna och svansen i en graciös sväng runt benen.
    It slept on the porch with its head on its paws and the tail graciously curled around the legs.
  2. (slang) a hand
    Bort med tassarna!
    Hands off! Paws off!


Related termsEdit


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