Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

tax +‎ -er

NounEdit

taxer ‎(plural taxers)

  1. One who taxes.
  2. (Britain, Cambridge University slang) One of two officers chosen yearly to regulate the assize of bread, and to see the true gauge of weights and measures is observed.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, borrowed from Latin taxāre, present active infinitive of taxō. Replaced the older tausser. Cf. also taux.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

taxer

  1. to tax, to impose a tax on

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin taxāre, present active infinitive of taxō. Cf. also the older form tauxer (whence French taux), tausser, which was replaced.

VerbEdit

taxer

  1. to tax, to impose a tax on

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. In the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tacēre, present active infinitive of taceō. Compare Italian tacere

VerbEdit

taxer

  1. (intransitive) to shut up (be quiet)

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.