See also: tŵr

EgyptianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

twr
r
A24

 3-lit.

  1. (transitive) to make ritually clean with water, natron, or incense; to cleanse, to purify
  2. (intransitive) to be(come) ritually pure or clean
  3. (intransitive, of the sky) to be(come) clear

InflectionEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

twr
r
qsY1V

 m

  1. ritual purity or cleanliness

NounEdit

t
wr
r
qsmwA1

 m

  1. cleaner-priest [Greco-Roman Period]
  2. used as an epithet of the king or the god Horus [Greco-Roman Period]

InflectionEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

twr
r

 3-lit.

  1. (transitive) to show respect to (people or statues of the dead), to treat reverently

InflectionEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

twr
r
 

 3-lit.

  1. (transitive) to turn away, to reject or repulse [Pyramid Texts and later archaizing texts]

InflectionEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

twr
r
qs

 m

  1. a kind of plant, possibly a kind of reed, used medicinally

Alternative formsEdit

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Welsh twrr, *tor, probably from Proto-Celtic (Cornish tor, Scottish Gaelic tòrr), possibly borrowed from Old English torr (a high rock, tower), though the reverse is more likely; all ultimately from Latin turris (tower) and of non-Indo-European origin.

More at English tor and tor. Also compare Latin Taurini.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

twr m (plural tyrrau)

  1. crowd, group
  2. heap, pile

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
twr dwr nhwr thwr
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • A Book of Dartmoor (1900), p. 15
  • Crossing's Guide to Dartmoor, 1912 Edition, 1965 Reprint (David & Charles, Newton Abbot)