Last modified on 29 November 2014, at 08:14

ye

See also: үе

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ye, ȝe, from Old English ġē (ye), the nominative case of the second-person plural personal pronoun, from West Germanic *jīz, variant of Proto-Germanic *jūz (ye), from Proto-Indo-European *yūs (ye), *yū́, plural of *túh₂. Cognate with Scots ye (ye), Dutch gij, jij, je (ye), Low German ji, jie (ye), German ihr (ye), Danish and Swedish I (ye), Icelandic ér (ye). See also you.

Alternative formsEdit

  • ȝe (chiefly in Middle English)

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ye (personal pronoun)

  1. (archaic outside Northern England, Cornish, Ireland) You (the people being addressed).
Usage notesEdit

Ye was originally used only for the nominative case (as the subject), and only for the second-person plural. Later, ye was used as a subject or an object, either singular or plural, which is the way that you is used today.

Derived termsEdit
ReferencesEdit
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]

VerbEdit

ye (present participle yeyn)

  1. (obsolete) Address a single person by the use of the pronoun ye instead of thou.
    • 1483, Catholicon Anglicum: An English–Latin Wordbook (Monson 168), page 426
      To ȝe, vosare jn plurali numero vos vestrum vel tibi [perh. read vobis].
    • 1511, Promptorium Parvulorum (de Worde), sig. M.iiiᵛ/2
      Yeyn or sey ye with worshyp, viso.
SynonymsEdit
  • (address by the pronoun ye): yeet (obsolete)
AntonymsEdit
  • (address by the pronoun ye): thowt (obsolete)

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English þe. The letter y is a variant of þ (thorn), a letter which corresponds to modern th, but letter þ did not exist in first press typographies, so was replaced using either "th" or "y". Etymological y was for a time distinguished by a dot, , but the letters were conflated when that was dropped.

PronunciationEdit

  • Traditionally pronounced the same as the, but now often pronounced with the ordinary sound of <y>: IPA(key): /jiː/

ArticleEdit

ye

  1. (archaic, definite) the
    • 1647, The old deluder, Satan, Act. (cited in American Public School Law, K. Alexander, M. Alexander, 1995)
      It being one cheife proiect of ye ould deluder, Satan, to keepe men from the knowledge of v Scriptures, as in formr times by keeping ym in an unknowne tongue, so in these lattr times by perswading from ye use of tongues, yt so at least ye true sence & meaning of ye originall might be clouded by false glosses of saint seeming deceivers, yt learning may not be buried in ye church and commonwealth, the Lord assisting or endeavors,—
    • Ye Olde Medicine Shoppe.
Derived termsEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

ye

  1. third-person singular present indicative of ser

CatawbaEdit

NounEdit

ye

  1. Man (adult male human), men.
  2. Person, people.
  3. Native American Indian(s).

Usage notesEdit

  • Catawba nouns do not inflect for number.
  • Many of Catawba's names for tribes incorporate this word, e.g. yę iswa (people of the river: the Catawba), yę manterą (people born in/on the land: the Cherokee).
  • The vowel of this word is generally nasalized; this is reflected in different ways or not at all in different transcriptions: ye, , yen. Sometimes, an initial i, also nasalized, is found: inyen / įyę.

ReferencesEdit

  • 1858, Oscar M. Lieber, Vocabulary of the Catawba Language
  • 1900, Albert S. Gatschet, Grammatic Sketch of the Catawba Language (published in the American Anthropologist)
  • 1942, Frank G. Speck and C. E. Shaeffer, Catawba Kinship and Social Organization
  • 1945, Frank T. Siebert, Jr., Linguistic Classification of Catawba (published in the International Journal of American Linguistics)

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

VerbEdit

ye

  1. Form of se used at the end of a phrase, after the predicate and the subject, in that order; to be.
    Kimoun ou ye? (Who are you?; literally, Who you are?)

IdoEdit

PrepositionEdit

ye

  1. at

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

ye

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

ye (plural)

  1. eyes
    • Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, General Prologue, lines 9–10:
      And smale foweles maken melodye, / That slepen al the nyght with open ye.


NovialEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Esperanto je.

PrepositionEdit

ye

  1. wild card preposition

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /ji:/, /jɪ/

PronounEdit

ye (second person, singular or plural; possessive determiner yer, possessive pronoun yers, singular reflexive yersel, plural reflexive yersel)

  1. you

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

ye f (plural yes)

  1. Name of the letter y.

SynonymsEdit


TurkishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

ye

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter Y/y.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Persian یه (ye).

NounEdit

ye

  1. Last letter of the Arabic alphabet: ي
    • Previous: و

VerbEdit

ye

  1. Second-person imperative of yemek.
AntonymsEdit

UzbekEdit

VerbEdit

ye

  1. imperative of yemoq

VolapükEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ye

  1. however

ZuluEdit

PronounEdit

-ye

  1. Combining stem of yena.

See alsoEdit