Last modified on 4 December 2014, at 15:50

gap

See also: gäp

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gap (chasm), related to Old Norse gapa (to gape); compare gape.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gap (plural gaps)

  1. An opening in anything made by breaking or parting.
    a gap in a fence;   He made a gap by kicking a weak spot.
  2. An opening allowing passage or entrance.
    We can slip through that gap.
  3. An opening that implies a breach or defect.
    There is a gap between the roof and the gutter.
  4. A vacant space or time.
    I have a gap in my schedule next Tuesday.
  5. A hiatus.
    • 2013 August 3, “The machine of a new soul”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8847: 
      The yawning gap in neuroscientists’ understanding of their topic is in the intermediate scale of the brain’s anatomy. Science has a passable knowledge of how individual nerve cells, known as neurons, work. It also knows which visible lobes and ganglia of the brain do what. But how the neurons are organised in these lobes and ganglia remains obscure. Yet this is the level of organisation that does the actual thinking—and is, presumably, the seat of consciousness.
    I'm taking a gap.
  6. A mountain or hill pass.
    The exploring party went through the high gap in the mountains.
  7. (Sussex) A sheltered area of coast between two cliffs (mostly restricted to place names).
    At Birling Gap we can stop and go have a picnic on the beach.
  8. (baseball) The regions between the outfielders.
    Jones doubled through the gap.
  9. (Australia, for a medical or pharmacy item) The shortfall between the amount the medical insurer will pay to the service provider and the scheduled fee for the item.
    • 2008, Eileen Willis, Louise Reynolds, Helen Keleher, Understanding the Australian Health Care System, page 5,
      Under bulk billing the patient does not pay a gap, and the medical practitioner receives 85% of the scheduled fee.
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  11. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 1995, Robert E. Knoll, “A University on the Defensive 1920-1927”, in Prairie University: A History of the University of Nebraska, page 70:
      When Charles Bessey suddenly died in 1916 at age seventy, he left a gap that was impossible to fill; and though his protégé. R. J. Pool, was a man of intelligence and character, he did not have Bessey’s authority.
  12. (Australia) (usually written as "the gap") The disparity between the indigenous and non-indigenous communities with regard to life expectancy, education, health, etc.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

gap (third-person singular simple present gaps, present participle gapping, simple past and past participle gapped)

  1. (transitive) To notch, as a sword or knife.
  2. (transitive) To make an opening in; to breach.
  3. (transitive) To check the size of a gap.
    I gapped all the sparkplugs in my car then realized I used the wrong manual and had made them too small.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gap

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gappen
  2. imperative of gappen

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

gap

  1. rafsi of gapru.

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Presumably from gapa (to gape).

PronunciationEdit

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /ˈɡap/

NounEdit

gap n (genitive gaps, plural gǫp)

  1. gap, empty space
    • Vǫluspá, verse 3, lines 7-8, in 1860, T. Möbius, Edda Sæmundar hins fróða: mit einem Anhang zum Theil bisher ungedruckter Gedichte. Leipzig, page 1:
      [] gap var ginnunga, / en gras hvergi.
      [] gap was of void, / but grass nowhere.
  2. (figuratively) shouting, crying, gab
    • Haralds saga herdráða 64, in 1868, C. R. Unger, G. Vigfússon, Flateyjarbok. Udg. efter offentlig foranstaltning, Volume 3. Christiania, page 425:
      [] þar uar suo mikit hareyste og gap []
      [] there was so much noise and gab []

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

  • gapa (to gape)
  • gapi (reckless man)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Norwegian Bokmål: gap
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: gap
  • Swedish: gap

ReferencesEdit

  • gap in An Icelandic-English Dictionary, R. Cleasby and G. Vigfússon, Clarendon Press, 1874, at Internet Archive.
  • gap in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.