Last modified on 14 December 2014, at 15:17

prime

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French prime, from Latin primus (first), from Old Latin pri (before), from Proto-Indo-European *per- (beyond, before).

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.
Particularly: “how did the symbol get its name?”

AdjectiveEdit

prime (not comparable)

  1. First in importance, degree, or rank.
    Our prime concern here is to keep the community safe.
  2. First in time, order, or sequence
    Both the English and French governments established prime meridians in their capitals.
    • Tennyson
      prime forests
    • Milton
      She was not the prime cause, but I myself.
  3. First in excellence, quality, or value.
    This is a prime location for a bookstore.
  4. (mathematics, lay) Having exactly two integral factors: itself and unity (1 in the case of integers).
    Thirteen is a prime number.
  5. (mathematics, technical) Such that if it divides a product, it divides one of the multiplicands.
  6. (mathematics) Having its complement closed under multiplication: said only of ideals.
  7. Marked or distinguished by the prime symbol.
  8. Early; blooming; being in the first stage.
    • Milton
      His starry helm, unbuckled, showed him prime / In manhood where youth ended.
  9. (obsolete) Lecherous; lustful; lewd.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

prime (plural primes)

  1. (Christianity, historical) One of the daily offices of prayer of the Western Church, associated with the early morning (typically 6 a.m.).
    • Spenser
      Early and late it rung, at evening and at prime.
  2. (obsolete) The early morning.
  3. (now rare) The earliest stage of something.
    • Hooker
      in the very prime of the world
    • Waller
      Hope waits upon the flowery prime.
  4. The most active, thriving, or successful stage or period.
  5. The chief or best individual or part.
    • Jonathan Swift
      Give him always of the prime.
  6. (music) The first note or tone of a musical scale.
  7. (fencing) The first defensive position, with the sword hand held at head height, and the tip of the sword at head height.
  8. (algebra, number theory) A prime element of a mathematical structure, particularly a prime number.
    • 2013 July-August, Sarah Glaz, “Ode to Prime Numbers”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 4: 
      Some poems, echoing the purpose of early poetic treatises on scientific principles, attempt to elucidate the mathematical concepts that underlie prime numbers. Others play with primes’ cultural associations. Still others derive their structure from mathematical patterns involving primes.
    3 is a prime.
  9. (card games) A four-card hand containing one card of each suit in the game of primero; the opposite of a flush in poker.
  10. (backgammon) Six consecutive blocks, which prevent the opponent's pieces from passing.
    I'm threatening to build a prime here.
  11. The symbol
  12. (chemistry, obsolete) Any number expressing the combining weight or equivalent of any particular element; so called because these numbers were respectively reduced to their lowest relative terms on the fixed standard of hydrogen as 1.
  13. An inch, as composed of twelve seconds in the duodecimal system.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

Origin uncertain; perhaps related to primage.

VerbEdit

prime (third-person singular simple present primes, present participle priming, simple past and past participle primed)

  1. (transitive) To prepare a mechanism for its main work.
    You'll have to press this button twice to prime the fuel pump.
  2. (transitive) To apply a coat of primer paint to.
    I need to prime these handrails before we can apply the finish coat.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To be renewed.
    • Quarles
      Night's bashful empress, though she often wane, / As oft repeats her darkness, primes again.
  4. (intransitive) To serve as priming for the charge of a gun.
  5. (intransitive, of a steam boiler) To work so that foaming occurs from too violent ebullition, which causes water to become mixed with, and be carried along with, the steam that is formed.
  6. To apply priming to (a musket or cannon); to apply a primer to (a metallic cartridge).
  7. To prepare; to make ready; to instruct beforehand; to coach.
    to prime a witness
    The boys are primed for mischief.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Thackeray to this entry?)
  8. (UK, dialect, obsolete) To trim or prune.
    to prime trees
  9. (mathematics) To mark with a prime mark.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Oxford-Paravia Concise - Dizionario Inglese-Italiano e Italiano-Inglese (in collaborazione con Oxford University Press). Edited by Maria Cristina Bareggi. Torino: Paravia, 2003. ISBN 8839551107. Online version here

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prime f (plural primes)

  1. reward; prize; bonus

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prime

  1. first

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prime

  1. feminine plural of primo

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NumeralEdit

prīme

  1. vocative masculine singular of prīmus

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prime

  1. feminine plural nominative form of prim
  2. feminine plural accusative form of prim
  3. neuter plural nominative form of prim
  4. neuter plural accusative form of prim

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

prime

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of primar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of primar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of primar.

TarantinoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prime

  1. first