EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

First at end of 16th century; borrowed from Middle French estimer, from Latin aestimō (to value, rate, weigh, estimate); see estimate and aim, an older word, partly a doublet of esteem.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪsˈtiːm/, /əsˈtiːm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːm

NounEdit

esteem (usually uncountable, plural esteems)

  1. Favourable regard.
    We hold her in high esteem.

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VerbEdit

esteem (third-person singular simple present esteems, present participle esteeming, simple past and past participle esteemed)

  1. To set a high value on; to regard with respect or reverence.
  2. To regard something as valuable; to prize.
  3. To look upon something in a particular way.
    Mary is an esteemed member of the community.
  4. (obsolete) To judge; to estimate; to appraise
    The Earth, which I esteem unable to reflect the rays of the Sun.

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