EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English all- (also al-), from Old English eall-, eal- (all-). Cognate with Dutch al-, German all-, Swedish all-. More at all.

PrefixEdit

all-

  1. Indicates complete power or authority in an area.
    all-knowing
    all-loving
    all-seeing
    all-powerful
  2. Indicates that a term applies in a general manner.
    all-around
    all-over
    all-right

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From all.

PrefixEdit

all-

  1. located beneath, at the bottom, nether, sub-

Derived termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

PrefixEdit

all-

  1. fairly, rather, decently [since the 17th century]
  2. (dated) very
    Ekki allfáir viðskiptavinir.
    Very many customers.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Category Icelandic words prefixed with all- not found

See alsoEdit

  • dá- (rather, fairly, quite)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ XIII. Bandstrik ("hyphens")

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From allr (all).

PrefixEdit

all-

  1. used as an intensive in front of adjectives and adverbs; very, extremely

ReferencesEdit

  • all- in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

all-

  1. out, off, ex-, extra-
    all- + ‎morio (to travel by sea) → ‎allforio (to export)
    all- + ‎plyg (folded) → ‎allblyg (extrovert)
    all- + ‎pwn (load, burden) → ‎allbwn (output)
    Synonyms: ech-, es-
  2. other, allo-
    all- + ‎tud (people, nation) → ‎alltud (stranger; exile)
    all- + ‎ffôn (phone) → ‎allffon (allophone)

Derived termsEdit

AntonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
all- unchanged unchanged hall-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “all-”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies