at-

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English at-, et-, æt-, from Old English æt- ‎(at, near, toward, beyond, away), from Proto-Germanic *at ‎(at, to, towards), from Proto-Indo-European *ád ‎(at, near). More at at.

PrefixEdit

at-

  1. (obsolete, no longer productive) Prefix meaning at, close to, to, away, off.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • at- in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

LatvianEdit

PrefixEdit

at-

  1. Usually found on verbs (and their derived nouns or adjectives) with the meaning 'away,' or also 'open' (like Russian от- ‎(ot-)).

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit



Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alternative form of ant-.

PrefixEdit

at-

  1. Alternative form of ant-

Etymology 2Edit

From at ‎(at). More at at

PrefixEdit

at-

  1. at, toward
    atmorgan ‎(tomorrow)
  2. with
    atsamna ‎(together)
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