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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From atone (reconciled), from Middle English atone, attone, atoon (agreed, literally at one), equivalent to at +‎ one. Compare Latin adūnō (I unite, make one) for the similar formation.

The word, along with only and alone, is markworthy for retaining the old pronunciation of one and once, not having undergone diphthongization, as it lacked a stressed vowel, which often becomes a diphthong.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈtəʊn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /əˈtoʊn/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊn

VerbEdit

atone (third-person singular simple present atones, present participle atoning, simple past and past participle atoned)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To make reparation, compensation, amends or satisfaction for an offence, crime, mistake or deficiency. [from 1680s]
    Synonyms: expiate, propitiate
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To bring at one or at concordance; to reconcile; to suffer appeasement. [from 1570s]
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To agree or accord; to be in accordance or harmony. [from 1590s]
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To unite in making.
  5. (proscribed) To absolve (someone else) of wrongdoing, especially by standing as an equivalent.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

atone (plural atones)

  1. expressionless
  2. (linguistics) unstressed
  3. (linguistics) mute

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

atone

  1. Feminine plural of adjective atono.

AnagramsEdit