Reconstruction:Proto-Slavic/otъ

This Proto-Slavic entry contains reconstructed terms and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Slavic edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *ati (as a prefix: *at-), probably from Proto-Indo-European *h₁óti, o-grade variant of *h₁éti (beyond, further; also), or alternatively from *h₂éti (but). Cognate with Lithuanian at- (back, away), Latvian at- (back away), Old Prussian at-, et- (back, away) (the latter from an apparent variant *et-).

Preposition edit

*otъ[1][2][3]

  1. (with genitive) from, away from
  2. (with genitive) originating from, starting from (a place or time), since
  3. (with genitive) of, made of, consisting of
  4. (with genitive) out of (a selection)
  5. (with genitive) by (in passive; by the action of)
Usage notes edit

All modern slavic languages except Polabian, Russian, Sorbian and Bulgarian have generalized ot to od, which is the statistically more prevalent form due to word sandhi (i.e. before vowels, sonorants and voiced consonants), and which was reanalyzed as the basic, normal form.

Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit
Descendants edit
  • East Slavic:
    • Old East Slavic: отъ (otŭ), ѿ (otŭ)
    • Old Novgorodian: ѿ (ote)
  • South Slavic:
  • West Slavic:

Further reading edit

  • Vasmer, Max (1964–1973) “от”, in Oleg Trubachyov, transl., Этимологический словарь русского языка [Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language] (in Russian), Moscow: Progress
  • Georgiev, Vladimir I., Duridanov, I. V., editors (1995), “от”, in Български етимологичен речник [Bulgarian Etymological Dictionary] (in Bulgarian), volume 4 (мѝнго² – па̀дам), Sofia: Prof. Marin Drinov Pubg. House, →ISBN, page 952

References edit

  1. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008) “*ot(ъ)”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, →ISSN, page 382:prep. ‘from’
  2. ^ Olander, Thomas (2001) “ot(ъ)”, in Common Slavic Accentological Word List[1], Copenhagen: Editiones Olander:(prep. and prefix) (PR 146)
  3. ^ Snoj, Marko (2016) “od”, in Slovenski etimološki slovar [Slovenian Etymology Dictionary] (in Slovene), 3rd edition, https://fran.si:Pslovan. *otъ

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *áta, from Proto-Indo-European *átta (father). Baby-talk word.

Cognates include Albanian atë, Ancient Greek ἄττα (átta), Hittite 𒀜𒋫𒀸 (attaš, father), Latin atta, Proto-Germanic *attô (whence Gothic 𐌰𐍄𐍄𐌰 (atta), Old High German atto), Proto-Celtic *attyos (whence Old Irish aite), Ossetian ӕда (æda, grandfather).

Similarly sounding words are also attested in Proto-Turkic *ata (father; ancestor) and Proto-Uralic *attɜ (father, grandfather).

Noun edit

*òtъ m[1][2][3][4][5]

  1. father
    Synonyms: *bata, *tata
Alternative reconstructions edit
Declension edit
Related terms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • West Slavic:
    • Kashubian: óta (grandma)

References edit

  1. ^ Zhuravlyov, A. F., editor (2014), “*otьcь”, in Этимологический словарь славянских языков [Etymological dictionary of Slavic languages] (in Russian), numbers 39 (*otъtęti – *ozgǫba), Moscow: Nauka, →ISBN, page 168
  2. ^ Melnychuk, O. S., editor (2003), “оте́ць”, in Етимологічний словник української мови [Etymological Dictionary of the Ukrainian Language] (in Ukrainian), volume 4 (Н – П), Kyiv: Naukova Dumka, →ISBN, page 232
  3. ^ Vasmer, Max (1964–1973) “оте́ц”, in Oleg Trubachyov, transl., Этимологический словарь русского языка [Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language] (in Russian), Moscow: Progress
  4. ^ Georgiev, Vladimir I., Duridanov, I. V., editors (1995), “оте́ц”, in Български етимологичен речник [Bulgarian Etymological Dictionary] (in Bulgarian), volume 4 (мѝнго² – па̀дам), Sofia: Prof. Marin Drinov Pubg. House, →ISBN, page 960
  5. ^ Snoj, Marko (2016) “oče”, in Slovenski etimološki slovar [Slovenian Etymology Dictionary] (in Slovene), 3rd edition, https://fran.si
  6. 6.0 6.1 Moszyński, Leszek (2006) Wstęp do filologii słowiańskiej [Introduction to Slavic Philology]‎[2] (in Polish), 2nd edition, Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN, →ISBN, page 233