See also: towards and to-ward

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English toward, from Old English tōweard, equivalent to to +‎ -ward

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

toward (chiefly US)

  1. In the direction of.
    She moved toward the door.
  2. In relation to (someone or something).
    What are your feelings toward him?
  3. For the purpose of attaining (an aim).
    I'm saving money toward retirement.
  4. Located close to; near (a time or place).
    Our place is over toward the station.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

toward (not comparable)

  1. Yielding, pliant; docile; ready or apt to learn; not froward.
  2. (obsolete) Future; to-come.
  3. (dated) Approaching, coming near; impending; present, at hand.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene vi]:
      Do you hear aught, sir, of a battle toward?
    • 1843 April, Thomas Carlyle, “Practical Devotional”, in Past and Present, New York, N.Y.: William H. Colyer, [], published May 1843, OCLC 10193956, book II (The Ancient Monk), page 70:
      On the morrow, after mass, our Lord Abbot [Samson of Tottington] orders the Cellerarius to send off his carpenters to demolish the said structure brevi manu, and lay up the wood in safe keeping. Old Dean Herbert, hearing what was toward, comes tottering along hither, to plead humbly for himself and his mill.
  4. (obsolete or archaic) Promising, likely.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English tōweard, tōwærd; equivalent to to +‎ -ward.

PrepositionEdit

toward

  1. In the direction of; toward.
  2. Into the presence of.
  3. In proximity to; near, by.
  4. In an exchange or communication with; to.
    • c. 1190 - 1215, Layamon, Laȝamon's Brut
      Þe while þe he spac touward Goden.
  5. Having a wont or tendency towards.
  6. Similar to.
  7. Subject to; under the control of.
  8. Useful for; prepared for.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: toward

AdjectiveEdit

toward

  1. Future, forthcoming; to come.
  2. Near at hand; imminent, nigh.
  3. Moving forth.
  4. of goodwill, benevolent; well-tempered, gentle.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

AdverbEdit

toward

  1. In a given direction, typically toward something specific.
  2. Nearly, almost.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit