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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tunne, tonne (cask, barrel), from Old English tunne (tun, cask, barrel), from Proto-Germanic *tunnǭ, *tunnō (tun, barrel, cask), of unknown origin. Cognate with North Frisian tenn (tun, barrel, cask), Dutch ton (tun, barrel, cask), German Tonne (tun, barrel, drum), Danish tønde (barrel), Swedish tunna (barrel, cask, tun), Icelandic tunna (barrel). Compare also Old French tonne, French tonneau (ton, barrel), Medieval Latin tunna (cask), Middle Irish tunna (cask), Welsh tynell (tun, barrel). It is uncertain whether the Germanic or the Celtic forms are the original.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tun (plural tuns)

  1. A large cask; an oblong vessel bulging in the middle, like a pipe or puncheon, and girt with hoops; a wine cask.
  2. (brewing) A fermenting vat.
  3. An old English measure of capacity for liquids, containing 252 wine gallons; equal to two pipes.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, p. 205:
      Again, by 28 Hen. VIII, cap. 14, it is re-enacted that the tun of wine should contain 252 gallons, a butt of Malmsey 126 gallons, a pipe 126 gallons, a tercian or puncheon 84 gallons, a hogshead 63 gallons, a tierce 41 gallons, a barrel 31.5 gallons, a rundlet 18.5 gallons.
  4. A weight of 2,240 pounds.
  5. An indefinite large quantity.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, (please specify the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals)]:
      :
      He therefore sends you, meeter for your spirit, / This tun of treasure; and, in lieu of this, / Desires you let the dukedoms that you claim / Hear no more of you.
    • 1682, John Dryden, "Mac Flecknoe", lines 195-196:
      A Tun of Man in thy Large bulk is writ, / But sure thou'rt but a Kilderkin of wit.
  6. (archaic, humorous or derogatory) A drunkard.
  7. (zoology) Any shell belonging to Tonna and allied genera; called also tun-shell.

VerbEdit

tun (third-person singular simple present tuns, present participle tunning, simple past and past participle tunned)

  1. (transitive) To put into tuns, or casks.
    • 1843, Mary Holland, The Complete Economical Cook, and Frugal Housewife[1], fourteenth edition, page 407:
      Strong beer that is brewed in small quantities, and ale, whatever the quantity may be, should be tunned the second day after brewing; and small beer should be tunned as soon as it has fairly taken the yeast

Etymology 2Edit

Mayan. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

NounEdit

tun (plural tuns)

  1. A part of the ancient Maya Long Count Calendar system which corresponds to 18 winal cycles or 360 days.

AnagramsEdit


DalmatianEdit

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1Edit

A contraction of tunfisk, from German Thunfisch (tuna), from Latin thunnus, from Ancient Greek θύννος (thúnnos).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tuːn/, [tˢuːˀn]

NounEdit

tun c (singular definite tunen, plural indefinite tun)

  1. tuna
  2. tuna fish
  3. tun
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse tún, from Proto-Germanic *tūną, from Proto-Celtic *dūnom.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tuːn/, [tˢuːˀn]

NounEdit

tun n (singular definite tunet, plural indefinite tun)

  1. (dated) an enclosed piece of ground
InflectionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See tune.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tuːn/, [tˢuːˀn]

VerbEdit

tun

  1. imperative of tune

GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German tuon, from Old High German tuon, from Proto-Germanic *dōną. Akin to Low German doon, Dutch doen, English do, West Frisian dwaan; all derived from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to put, set, place).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tun (irregular, third-person singular simple present tut, past tense tat, past participle getan, auxiliary haben)

  1. to do (to perform or execute an action)
    Synonyms: machen
    Tu es!Do it!
    Man tut, was man kann.One does what one can.
    Er tat das, was man ihm gesagt hat.He did as he was told.
    Das einzige, was er je tat, war arbeiten.The only thing he ever did was work.
  2. (with dative) to do something (positive or negative) to someone
    Synonyms: antun
    Der tut Ihnen nichts!He won't hurt you! (said for example about a dog)
    Mein Mann hat mir so viel Gutes getan.My husband has done me so much good.
  3. (reflexive, with an indefinite pronoun) to make a difference; to be different
    Synonyms: unterscheiden
    Tut sich das viel?Does that make much of a difference?
    Die beiden Kameras tun sich nichts.The two cameras are no different [i.e. neither better than the other].
  4. (somewhat informal, with “so” or “als ob) to fake; to feign; to pretend
    Synonyms: vortäuschen, täuschen, vorgeben
    Er hat nur so getan.He just faked it.
    Er tut, als ob er nichts wüsste.He pretends to know nothing.
  5. (chiefly colloquial) to put, to place, to add
    Synonyms: setzen, legen, stellen, platzieren, hinzufügen
    Tu das hier rein.Put it in here.
    Ich würd noch was Salz an die Kartoffeln tun.I would add some more salt to the potatoes.
  6. (chiefly colloquial, with “es) to work, to function
    Synonyms: funktionieren
    Die Uhr tut’s nicht mehr.The clock doesn’t work anymore.
  7. (chiefly colloquial, but acceptable in writing) Used with the preceding infinitive of another verb to emphasise this verb
    Er singt immer noch gern, aber tanzen tut er gar nicht mehr.
    He still loves singing, but as to dancing, he doesn't do that anymore at all.
  8. (colloquial, nonstandard) Used with the following infinitive of another verb, often to emphasise the statement
    Ich tu doch zuhören!I am listening! (as a response to the reproach that one is not)
    Ich tu das jetzt mal aufräumen.I’m cleaning this up now.
  9. (colloquial, nonstandard) Used in the past subjunctive with the infinitive of another verb to form the conditional tense (instead of standard würde)
    Ich tät mir das noch mal überlegen.I would think about that again.

Usage notesEdit

  • The verb tun in the sense of “to perform” is not used in combination with nouns. This function is covered by the verb machen: ich mache Sport, wir machen ein Spiel, er macht die Wäsche (“I do sport, we do a game, he does the laundry”). The same is true with pronouns that represent such nouns: Wer macht die Wäsche? – Ich mache sie. (“Who does the laundry? – I do it.”) It is usually ungrammatical to use tun in sentences like these.
Tun is only used with pronouns that represent actions as a whole: Was tust du? (“What are you doing?”) Ich tue viel für die Umwelt. (“I do a lot for the environment.”) Er tut alles, was sie sagt. (“He does everything she says.”)
  • (colloquial, nonstandard): The use of do-support is a feature of several dialects and minority languages in Germany. In the standard language, it is most established along the Rhine. It is somewhat more acceptable when used for emphasis (as in the first example above), but is otherwise often regarded as illiterate (as in the second example). This latter usage is generally associated with lower socio-economic status.

ConjugationEdit

  • The 1st person singular indicative present active is also (ich) tu.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


HausaEdit

PrepositionEdit

tun

  1. since, ever since

Inari SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Samic *tonë.

PronounEdit

tun

  1. you (singular)

Further readingEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

tun

  1. Nonstandard spelling of tūn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of tún.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of tǔn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of tùn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

MapudungunEdit

VerbEdit

tun (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. to catch

ConjugationEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

tun m (plural tuns)

  1. (Jersey) tuft

SynonymsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse tún. Akin to English town.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tun n (definite singular tunet, indefinite plural tun, definite plural tuna)

  1. courtyard, front yard (the area in front of, around or between houses, particularly on a farm)
    • 1996, Jon Fosse, Nokon kjem til å komme:
      I tunet framfor eit gammalt ganske forfallent hus []
      In the front yard in front of an old, rather dilapidated house []
  2. farmstead (collection of buildings and the area between them on a farm)

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *tūną (enclosure). Cognate with Old Frisian tūn, Old Saxon tūn, Dutch tuin (garden), Old High German zūn (German Zaun (fence)), Old Norse tún (Swedish tun (fence)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tūn m

  1. An enclosed piece of ground, an enclosure or garden.
  2. The enclosed ground belonging to an individual dwelling.
  3. The group of houses on an area of enclosed land, a homestead.
  4. A large inhabited place, a town.

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • dōn "to place, put, set"

Old FrenchEdit

PronounEdit

tun m (feminine ta)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) your (second-person singular possessive pronoun)

SynonymsEdit

  • vostre (second-person plural form)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tonus. See also the doublet ton (tone), borrowed through French.

NounEdit

tun n (plural tunuri)

  1. cannon
  2. (archaic, popular) thunderclap

Related termsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tonus.

NounEdit

tun m

  1. sound
  2. thunder

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

tun m (plural tunes)

  1. (music) A Pre-Hispanic percussion instrument from Guatemala, consisting of a hollow wooden block with slits in the sides

TetumEdit

VerbEdit

tun

  1. to descend