See also: Aurum

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aurum (gold). Doublet of or.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aurum (uncountable)

  1. (chemistry) gold, used in the names of various substances (see Derived terms)
  2. An Italian liqueur

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Malay: aurum

LatinEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la
Chemical element
Au
Previous: platinum (Pt)
Next: hydrargyrum (Hg)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Rhoticization of earlier ausum, from Proto-Italic *auzom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂é-h₂us-óm (gold), from *h₂ews- (to dawn, become light, become red). Cognate with Lithuanian áuksas, Old Lithuanian ausas, Old Prussian ausis, Tocharian A wäs, Tocharian B yasā.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aurum n (genitive aurī); second declension

  1. gold (as mineral or metal)
  2. gold (colour)
  3. any object made of gold, such as a gold coin or a gold ring
  4. lustre
  5. a Golden Age

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative aurum
Genitive aurī
Dative aurō
Accusative aurum
Ablative aurō
Vocative aurum

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Balkan-Romance:
  • Dalmatian:
  • Italo-Romance:
  • Padanian:
  • Gallo-Romance:
    • Occitan: aur
    • Old Catalan: or, aur
      • Catalan: or
    • Old French: or
      • Middle French: or, aur
        • French: or
          • Haitian Creole:
        • English: or
      • Walloon: ôr
  • Ibero-Romance:
  • Ancient borrowings:
    • Albanian: ar
    • Old Irish: ór (see there for further descendants)
    • Proto-Brythonic: *awr (see there for further descendants)
  • Learned borrowings:

ReferencesEdit

  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 63

Further readingEdit

  • aurum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • aurum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aurum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • aurum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • aurum”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aurum”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

MalayEdit

Chemical element
Au
Previous: platinum (Pt)
Next: perak cergas (Hg)

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English aurum, from Latin aurum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aurum (Jawi spelling اٴوروم‎, informal 1st possessive aurumku, 2nd possessive aurummu, 3rd possessive aurumnya)

  1. gold (element)

SynonymsEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

aurum

  1. dative plural of eyrir