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EnglishEdit

 
Metallic lustre of hematite
 
Vitreous lustre of amethyst
 
Chandelier decorated with glass lustres dangling below

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlʌstə/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Middle French lustre. See luster (etymology 1).

NounEdit

lustre (countable and uncountable, plural lustres)

  1. (British spelling) Alternative form of luster (shine, etc.)
  2. (Geology) the way in which the surface of any particular type of mineral reflects light differently from other minerals, which is helpful in telling minerals apart.
    Various kinds of minerals differ in their lustre; iron pyrites are described as having a metallic lustre, glassy materials a vitreous lustre; others, such as opal, look resinous, and the lustres of yet others are described as being either pearly, or silky, or dull, like earth.
  3. a glass ornament such as a prism or cut glass dangling beneath a chandelier; usually in clusters or festoons
    • 2013, Shena Mackay, Redhill Rococo, →ISBN:
      ...he went out through the unfamiliar hall, setting the chandelier clashing its dusty lustres with his hand, leaving a prismatic jangle behind him in the empty house.
  4. (dated in English) a chandelier, particularly one decorated with glass lustres
    • 1838, John Henry Brady, A new pocket guide to London and its environs[1]:
      In the centre is painted an eagle, from whose beak an elegant glass lustre chandelier is suspended. There are also ten smaller chandeliers in different parts of the room.
    • 1889, Anonymous, The Journal of Gas Lighting, Water Supply & Sanitary Improvement[2]:
      On the ground floor, the library (a room in carved oak) is lighted by a lustre composed of twelve regenerative burners enclosed in tinted glasses.
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

lustre (third-person singular simple present lustres, present participle lustring, simple past and past participle lustred)

  1. (British spelling) Alternative form of luster
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin lustrum. See luster (etymology 2)

NounEdit

lustre (plural lustres)

  1. (British spelling) Alternative form of luster (a lustrum)
TranslationsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for lustre in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lustrum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lustre m (plural lustres)

  1. lustrum (period of five years)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin lūstrum.

NounEdit

lustre m (plural lustres)

  1. lustrum; period of five years
  2. (figuratively) a very long time
    Ça fait des lustres que je ne t'ai pas vu !I haven't seen you in ages!

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Italian lustro.

NounEdit

lustre m (plural lustres)

  1. lustre, chandelier
  2. gloss, shine, lustre

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


InterlingueEdit

NounEdit

lustre (plural lustres)

  1. luster (light)
  2. polish
  3. (historical) lustrum

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lustre f pl

  1. feminine plural of lustro

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian lustro.

NounEdit

lustre m (plural lustres)

  1. lustre; shine

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
 
lustre

EtymologyEdit

From French lustre.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lustre m (plural lustres)

  1. chandelier

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlustɾe/, [ˈlust̪ɾe]

NounEdit

lustre m (plural lustres)

  1. lustre, shine

VerbEdit

lustre

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of lustrar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of lustrar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of lustrar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of lustrar.

Further readingEdit